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Three Things Home Buyers Should Never Do

Misunderstandings, problems, or shortcomings in the buying process many need correction to end negative results. This is not about blame, but learning how to proceed constructively:

  • Buyers who begin homeownership out of their financial depth are not on the path to success or happiness. Sticking to your budget is not losing out, but progressing sanely.
  • Research-savvy buyers, who ask questions and uncover deal-breaker property weaknesses will not end up as extremely-disappointed property owners faced with expensive problems to correct or law suits to fight.
    Home buyers will be rewarded by remembering that there are three things never to forget when buying real estate:

#1: Never quit: Real estate values continue to rise — rarely getting cheaper. Give up and you end up with nothing. If you quit, you’ll join the ranks of those who spend the rest of their lives talking about the real estate that got away. I’ve heard so many stories about properties that people almost bought or always wanted to buy. When I ask what happened, they usually don’t know. Many say they just gave up. “I guess it was not meant to be” is a common answer. Don’t let this be you. If you’re losing out on offers, find out exactly why.

  • Most sellers care about who buys their home and will make new memories there. Personalize your offer with a video or unique offer. One enterprising chef offered to come and cook dinner for the owners once the offer was accepted. A couple’s short, punchy video showed what they had gone through to find that house and what they dreamed about doing there… all with magazine pictures cut out by their kids. You may not be creative, but be sincere with a letter or short video (less than a minute or two) that your real estate professional can use to introduce you and your offer to purchase.
  • The real estate market may change as you continue shopping. If prices rise, you may end up in the wrong price range. Explore other locations and types of housing. Buying a two- or three-unit income property may give you the financial leverage you need for the area you prefer.
  • Your relationship with your real estate professional may not be working to your advantage. What’s missing? Is it time to quit that relationship, not the buying project?

#2: Never rely on verbals.: Verbal assurances from sellers, home inspectors, or real estate professionals are worth the paper they are printed on! In real estate, it’s what’s on paper that counts[&mdash]what you can rove indisputably in a disagreement or in court.

  • Sellers may say they’ll leave all the appliances, playground equipment, or anything else. If you really want something, include it in the offer with a description that precludes substitution with lesser models.
  • The real estate professional may assure you about many things the sellers will do or not do before closing. If something matters to you, make sure it is written into the offer, so there is no doubt what will be done, to what standards, when, and at who’s cost. Repairing the roof, finishing the bathroom renovation, cutting deadwood out of tall trees…all in writing in the offer.
  • If there’s something of specific value to you on the property, make sure it will remain intact. For instance, a stand of trees was assumed by one buyer to be a permanent fixture. The sellers thought that, since they’d grown the trees, they could harvest the trees as firewood as part of packing to move. What did the offer say on the subject?
  • The builder’s sales staff want to expedite your new home sale, but they may not have the power to make binding promises, warranties, or guarantees. Be sure you get the home you expect, by having details that matter to you written into the offer. Read the entire offer[—]yes all the small print. If you can’t follow the clauses, ask your real estate professional. Translating legalese for clients is a prime function for these professionals. Check important issues and clauses with your real estate lawyer. If you only want the house if it has a three-car garage, not a two-car, it’s vital to get that commitment from the builder into the offer in the correct way to overcome any sidestepping made allowable by the small print.

#3: Never think the work is over once the offer is accepted: Having your offer to purchase accepted is terrific! Hurrah! However, until closing, the house belongs to the seller and a lot can happen.

  • The seller is responsible for insuring the property and keeping it in good repair until closing.
  • Will the lender have all the mortgage funds ready for you on closing?
  • Both sides of the transaction need their lawyers tidying up loose ends. You’ll be busy with movers and perhaps school transfers.

Things can go wrong. I’m not trying to stress you out, but keep in touch with your real estate professional to be sure they are in touch with those finalizing the many details that must be resolved before closing. That’s not calling everyday in a panic. Clarify what details must be taken care of before closing. Then check off that list with your real estate professional, so nothing is left to the last minute. Once you get the keys and move in there may be carryover issues. Remain calm. Document the issues. Never quit until issues are completely resolved. Never rely on verbal assurances. Insist on written sign-offs, warranties, and receipts.

The First Offer May Be The Best Offer

Sometimes when everything goes right we have trouble accepting that fact. Perhaps nowhere is this phenomenon more clearly illustrated than in the case where a seller receives a good offer right away.

The annals of real estate are well stocked with stories of sellers who refused to take a good, but not perfect, first offer, and who then waited a long, long time before finally accepting something else at a considerably lower price. And most agents who have been around for a while know to shudder when a good strong offer is made almost at the outset of a listing; for the seller’s reservations are almost inevitable. “Did we list it too low?” “If someone will offer this much so soon, maybe we should wait a while and see if we can get more.” Etc.

When we read of Silicon Valley listings routinely selling at above list price, and while we are still in a period when multiple-offer situations are commonplace, it is understandable that such thoughts come to mind. Nonetheless, they are generally unfounded, especially if the market is anywhere near “normal”, as ours is today.

As an antidote to the ill effects of the “curse of the first offer”, a couple of observations might be kept in mind.

First, the fact that an offer is received early in the listing period — even in the first few days — doesn’t mean that the property has been listed too low.

It is easy to overlook how very efficient the residential real estate marketplace has become. Modern multiple listing systems (MLS) provide agents, and thus their buyer clients, with virtually instant access to information about existing inventory and about what has newly come on the market. In the old, old days a buyer’s agent did not become aware of new listings until “the book” (i.e. the compilation of MLS listings) was published. There might have been a lag time of ten days or more from the time the listing was taken.

Today, a good buyer’s agent will have electronically entered a “profile” of his client’s needs and price range into the system. Then, whenever he logs on to the MLS, he will be notified if a listing has been entered that matches that profile. In a low-inventory market such as we have had recently, buyers’ agents will log on a half-dozen times a day, or more, to see if an appropriate new listing has been entered. Moreover, in most systems the buyer’s agent is able to place the buyer himself on a similar notification.

The point is that potential buyers learn quickly of the existence of an appropriate new listing. Thus a flurry of activity at the outset of the listing does not necessarily imply a too-low price; rather, it reflects the efficiency of the system.

Secondly, an early first offer does not imply that the seller should hold out for full price.

We all know that there is typically a bit of a dance in the pricing and negotiating for a property. Sellers, with the concurrence of their agents, will usually list their property for an amount that is both higher than what they believe its value to be and higher than what they would be satisfied to receive. Why? Because they know that buyers almost always want and expect to pay less than the listed price

However, when an otherwise acceptable offer comes in near the outset of a listing period, sellers are frequently tempted to hold out for full price, or much closer to it than would normally be expected. Caution should be exercised in this regard.

For one thing, as we have noted, exposure of the property to buyers occurs pretty quickly nowadays, and sellers shouldn’t assume that there are going to be more, much less higher, offers as the listing period progresses.

Secondly, there often can be a transactional benefit to “leaving something on the table.” A real estate transaction is a process. These days, with inspections and disclosures, there are almost always “second negotiations” during the course of escrow. A buyer who feels ground down in the purchase negotiation may well be more difficult to deal with as other issues arise.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

3 Steps To Saving For Your Dream Home

According to Harvard University’s “State of the Nation’s Housing” report, while more people than ever before want to own their own home, fewer feel financially ready to do so yet. Reasons range from high rents to student loan debt.

Saving For Down

Millennials, in particular, are waiting longer to get married, start families and purchase their first home. But this is not necessarily bad news for the housing market. In fact, it could mean that the millennial generation has something to teach us all about saving consistently towards a big life goal such as owning your own home!

In this article, learn three important steps to take when you start saving for your dream home.

Step 1: Pay down your debt to clean up your credit.

Your credit score is a tricky business when it comes to saving for your first home. You have no history of carrying a mortgage, so you can’t make any real impact there. What you can do is to clean up your overall credit report so your general credit score is as healthy as possible before you apply for your mortgage loan.

According to the National Foundation for Credit Counseling (NFCC), a surprising number of Americans think they have “above average” (60 percent) to “very good” (41 percent) credit, although a full 48 percent have not seen their credit score in the past three years or ever.

So clearly, this is where you need to start. The best way to differentiate yourself from your competition (other people who are trying to convince a direct lender to give them a mortgage loan) is to pay down your debt, clear up any disputes on your credit report and, in so doing, boost your credit score so you can qualify for the best mortgage at the lowest interest rates.

Step 2: Separate and automate your savings.

Saving money is never going to be the easiest goal you attempt. In fact, according to The Atlantic, one of the chief reasons that nearly half of all Americans have little or no emergency savings to fall back on is taking on too much mortgage debt.

So here is a clear area where you should proceed with caution. First, save. Then, buy a home. The best approach to make saving as painless as possible for you is to automate your savings. You can do this by setting up direct deposit on your paycheck and then regular auto-drafts into a savings account reserved just for dream home savings. This way, you never even touch those funds and feel tempted to spend them instead.

Step 3: Downsize to upsize.

Finally, one effective change many adults today are making to save more towards their dream home is to downsize while they save. This can mean anything from moving to a smaller apartment to getting rid of your cable television subscription. Also, you must continually remind yourself why you have downsized in order for this step to work well.

But the key to making downsizing work to serve your greater goals is to make sure you deposit every cent of what you save into your dream home fund. Referring back to Step 2 here, the easiest way to do this is to calculate for yourself exactly what you are saving by paying less rent, giving up cable, etc., and then setting up a monthly auto draft in that amount to deposit directly into your dream home savings account.

By following these three steps, you can make tangible financial progress in saving to buy your dream home. If you can save 20 percent towards a downpayment, you can avoid paying expensive Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) and you may even qualify for a lower interest rate. Scrimping and saving is never fun or easy, but it will be worth it when your realtor hands you that brand-new set of house keys!

View All Sonoran Mountain Ranch Homes for Sale

Secluded in the foothills of North Peoria you will find the high desert setting breathtaking. Designed to preserve that setting, Sonoran Mountain Ranch offers a community that is harmonious to the desert backdrop. Extensive preserve spaces and washes offer many view lots for home sites. A wide variety of builders ensure there is something for everyone, including high end luxury homes by Camelot, as well as a custom home gated enclave set into the hillside.

Combined with access that gets you places quickly and amenities nearby, you have the best of both worlds at your fingertips. Hiking trails lead up the mountain side right from the sidewalks, lots of bike paths and walking trails complement the trails. The community has a large park area as well as assorted greenbelt and tot lots. There is land dedicated to a K-8 school at some point in the future. The community features approx. 1500 homes and/or lots. Homes here were built from 2004 to present. The community is nearing build out, but there are still opportunities to for a brand new home.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

5 Ways to Find The Right Movers When Moving Into a New Home

They say that the sun never sleeps in Phoenix, which is why moving there can be an exciting experience. However, there are a lot of things to take care of when moving. You need to find the perfect neighborhood and think about the stuff like which extra features are worth the money. In the rush of moving, many fail to focus on a crucial detail – finding the right moving company.

Movers can become an essential part of your moving experience. They can make the entire process a breeze or turn it into a nightmare. Don’t forget that they will be handling all your possessions, which is why you need to find a company you can trust. Take a look at 5 ways to find the right movers when moving into a new home in Phoenix:

Make Sure Your Movers Are Full-Time Professionals
Moving companies often hire sub-contractors that work part-time and come and go as they please. They are not a good choice because they lack skills and motivation to do the job the right way. Instead, you need to ensure that full-time professionals will handle your moving into a new home.

When you find an experienced team of professional movers, you know that you and your possessions will be treated with the utmost respect and courtesy. A professional crew of movers is well-coordinated, and they all feel like a part of the company. That guarantees that they will handle the move swiftly and with care. You can make the experience of moving in Phoenix even easier if you apply these tips from Low Budget Movers.

The Moving Company Must Provide Insurance Information
Regardless of how careful the movers are, accidents can happen. That is why you should make sure that your belongings are protected in case anything goes wrong. Any reputable moving company will be ready to provide insurance information upon your request.

There are various types of insurance movers can offer. Replacement insurance guarantees that your items will be replaced if they are damaged. Reputable movers also provide extra coverage for antiques and other expensive items.

Get Written Estimates from Several Companies
It might seem that the first movers you came across are the right choice, but make sure you get written estimates from several companies. If you’re getting an estimate over the phone or online, you should be as detailed as possible when telling about your moving needs.

Always ask movers to precisely explain what you are getting for the quoted fee. Beware of hidden expenses that can be made up along the way, such as travel, fuel or stair fees. When you narrow your options to a couple of moving companies, it might be a good idea to call them to visit you and make the final estimate.

Do the Research
You should put on your detective hat and inspect the reputation of the moving company you want to hire. First of all, you should make sure that it is a well-known company, so stay clear of those suspicious movers from Craigslist. After all, you don’t want just anyone handling your valuable possessions.

Any reputable company will have an updated website with its list of services. You can start there and move on to their social media pages to read comments from previous clients. A high BBB (Better Business Bureau) rating is also a sign of a reputable moving company, as well as any other reviews you can find online. Don’t worry if you run into a bad review or two; the important thing is that the majority of them are positive.

Ask Questions:
You should ask all sorts of questions to find out more about the movers. These include:

  • How long has the company been in business?
  • Do they provide a guarantee that the delivery will be completed on the desired date?
  • Do they run background checks on their movers?
  • Do they have their own equipment or rent a moving van?
  • Can the movers disassemble and assemble furniture?

Reputable companies understand the importance of establishing a relationship with the client. That is why they will be prepared to answer any questions you might have with ease and provide clear and detailed answers.

In the end, it is important to realize that choosing the right movers is an essential part of moving in Phoenix – and anywhere else. It might take a bit time and effort, but it will prove to be a wise investment. By selecting the right moving company, you will prevent any possible problems that may occur during the process.

For a list of moving companies we recommend please give us a call at 480-213-5251 or visit lowbudgetmovers.net.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

IS NOW THE BEST TIME EVER TO BUY YOUR FIRST HOME?

If you’ve been thinking about buying your first home, talk of rising mortgage rates may have you worried. But, the reality is that this may be one of the best opportunities for first-time buyers in recent memory. Conditions were already good for first-timers with new, super-low down payment loans. But the FHA’s announcement that they would be cutting mortgage-insurance premiums makes buying even more advantageous.

“The annual fees the Federal Housing Administration charges to guarantee mortgages it backs are being cut by a quarter of a percentage point,” said Bloomberg of a statement released by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). “With the reduction, the annual cost for most borrowers will be 0.60 percent of the loan balance.”

According to HUD, “The fee cut would save new FHA-insured homeowners an average of $500 this year. The cut would take effect on Jan. 27.”

What other factors should you be paying attention to if you’re looking to buy your first home?

Mortgage rates

Yes, rates are up from their lowest point. But the average 30-year fixed-mortgage rate right now is 4 percent, down a bit this week and waaaaaay down from decades ago when they were in the teens. You’ll pay a few bucks more per month now than you would have at this time last year, but, if you’re getting an FHA loan, those new mortgage interest cuts will help.

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More than anything, it’s important to be realistic. We’re not anywhere near gloom-and-doom time, despite some of the more hysterical talk out there. In fact, today’s rates are still near historic lows, which make buying a home more affordable than rent in many cities.

But, if you need to find a way to lower your monthly payment on your future home, and you’re not eager to search for less expensive homes, remember that your credit helps determine your mortgage-worthiness, and the better it is, the better your interest rate. If you’re not being offered the best rate out there, it’s time to…

Get your credit in order

Have great credit? Great! Your lender will be pleased and, presumably, you will be, too. But many of us need some help in this area, and even a small bump in your score can make a big difference not just to the rate you get but also whether you will qualify for a loan at all.

“The homebuyer’s credit score is among the most important factors when it comes to qualifying for a loan these days,” said Bankrate. Your lender will be able to give you tips for improving your score, which can range from checking your report for errors to paying off old delinquent accounts.

It’s also important to keep in mind that what you consider to be responsible credit management may not necessarily be seen as a positive when you go to qualify for a loan. “Just because you pay everything on time every month doesn’t mean your credit is stellar,” they said. “The amount of credit you’re using relative to your available credit limit, or your credit utilization ratio, can sink a credit score. The lower the utilization rate, the higher your score will be. Ideally, first-time homebuyers would have a lot of credit available, with less than a third of it used.”

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Low down payment loans

Please visit the mortgage section of our web site for a list of low down payment loan programs.

Investigate situation-specific loans

Are you a veteran, a police officer, or a firefighter? There may be a special loan for you with conditions that can make purchasing a home easier and more affordable. There are also specific loans for those who are buying a home that has (or needs) energy-efficient features, one that can be bundled with home improvement funds, and another from the USDA that can save those who are moving to a rural area money.

“This one may surprise you,” said nerdwallet. “The U.S. Department of Agriculture has a homebuyers assistance program. And no, you don’t have to live on a farm. The program targets rural areas and allows 100% financing by offering lenders mortgage guarantees. There are income limitations, which vary by region.”

7 IMPORTANT STEPS TO HELP YOU BUY YOUR FIRST HOME IN 2017

Thinking about buying your first home? What an exciting time this is bound to be. And, also, what a (potentially) overwhelming, confusing, and stress-filled time. It can easily veer into scary territory if you’re not prepared and not surrounding yourself with professionals who can help guide you in the right direction.

These seven tips can help you make that dream of homeownership come true in 2017.

1. Work with the right real estate agent

The guy next door or your brother’s girlfriend’s cousin who just got his real estate license may be hungry to get your business, but that doesn’t mean he’s your best bet. An experienced agent quite simply knows things that someone who is brand new probably doesn’t. An experienced agent will also have important relationships in place that may be able to help buyers in every facet of the home purchase, including:

  • Finding houses that aren’t even listed yet
  • Finding homes that may be slightly outside of a buyer’s criteria but that are worthy of consideration
  • Leveraging industry relationships to get you great deals or better terms
  • Managing appraisals and inspections
  • Working through every step of the purchase process and handling any issues that pop up along the way
  • Negotiating a deal that works for both sides

REALTOR

2. Don’t be afraid to talk to multiple lenders

Your Realtor will most likely have several lenders they have worked with and can refer you to. You may also want to speak to loved ones and get a referral or two from someone they’ve worked with successfully. Each lender may have a different recommendation and/or knowledge of a special loan that works for you, so it makes sense to look at a few different options.

3. Mind your credit

Many people have no idea what their credit score is, but if you’re thinking about buying a home, knowledge is power. Different loans have different minimum credit score requirements, and it could be that your score doesn’t measure up for the best loan rates, or maybe you need to do some work to qualify for even the most lenient loan.

A good mortgage lender can advise you on your best options to raise your score, from removing any errors on your credit report, to paying any delinquent accounts, to exploring credit repair options. The earlier you learn your score and delve into the details with a qualified lender, the more time you have to address any issues you find.

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4. Save, save, save

For many people, getting the down payment together is the hardest part of buying a home. And the closing costs can be an unwelcome surprise for those who weren’t expecting to have to come up with even more cash. When you first set out to buy a home, make sure you know how much you have to save. Your lender should be able to give you a pretty good ballpark based on a certain home price. Housing experts recommend adding 5% to that number just to be safe.

Even if you’ve never been a great saver in the past, there are strategies you can use that will help you build the nest egg you need for your down payment and closing costs, including these tips from nerdwallet:

  • Automatic transfers from your checking account to your savings can help to make the process mandatory – and maybe a little less painful.
  • Save raises and bonuses rather than spending them.
  • Set aside tax refunds.
  • Keep the change. At least a couple of banks have variations on this theme. For example, Bank of America allows debit card users to sign up for a service that rounds up purchases to the nearest dollar and puts the change into a linked savings account.
  • Visualize your goal. Slap big, beautiful photos of your dream house on the refrigerator, near your office workspace – and wrap a small one around the primary credit card in your wallet. You might charge less and save more.”

As for where to put that money while you watch it grow, experts recommend that “If the plan is to become a homeowner in the next 12 months, the money should be kept completely liquid. That means you can easily access it at any time,” said CNN Money. “The best way to do that is in a good old-fashioned savings account, Schulte said. Look for one with a higher yield. In today’s low rate environment, that probably means an online-only account like Ally or Synchrony Bank, which currently pay around 1% annually.”

5. Lock in your rate

Rates can be unpredictable. Locking in a rate when you get close to buying, which your lender will undoubtedly recommend, can protect you if rates rise. Many lenders also offer a one-time adjustment in case rates go down.

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6. Stay at your job

Not happy at work and thinking about making a change? If you’re looking to buy a home, you may have to delay that plan. Part of your qualification for a mortgage will be based on your job history. Making a big change just before you buy or during the escrow process will be problematic. Lenders advise buyers to stay the course until after the home closes escrow.

7. Don’t open new credit cards or buy a new car

Your lender will spell out the do’s and don’ts of how to protect your credit when trying to buy a house, but if you haven’t yet talked to anyone and you think you’re getting close to be purchase-ready, that Kohl’s card you take out to save 20% on your $100 bill could cost you. Before you take out any new debt, check with a lender.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

Its A Smart Decision To Buy A Home Over The Holidays

You know that play in football where the quarterback seems to hand the ball off to a running back and the entire defense concentrates on that “runner,” only to find that the ball ended up in the hands of someone on the other side, who then sprints down the sideline and scores a touchdown? That’s pretty much what it’s like to buy a home during the holidays. While everyone is busy looking at all the pretty, shiny things and on-sale things and yummy things, you’re sneaking around the other side with the ball, or, rather, the offer, that gets you the house you want.

Yes, when it comes to homebuying around the holidays, it’s advantage: buyer. With so many distractions between Halloween and New Year’s Day, you can slide right in there and make a smart move. So why, exactly, does it benefit you to buy a home over the holidays?

Because you just want to find a home already

The market has been hot for a few years, and, in many places, multiple offers and over-asking-price sales have become the norm. Competing in those markets can be demoralizing. Tales of buyers seeking million-dollar fixers on Los Angeles’ Westside just so they can get into something in the area – and being consistently outbid for more than a year – are more and more common.

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But buy over the holidays and you slice through the buyer pool. While others are trimming their tree or searching for the perfect pumpkin cheesecake recipe, you’re off snagging the home you want.

Because: First-time buyers

The above scenario, where buyers are constantly being outbid on homes, is a nightmare for first-timers looking for a home. Not only is there a verrrrrry limited supply of available homes that are affordable in the first place, but the number of folks that are vying for them is tremendous. If you’re in the market and have never done this before, you’re probably pretty frustrated.

There are time-tested tips for winning in a multiple-offer situation, like getting preapproved, limiting contingencies on the home, being flexible about the closing, and writing a “love letter” to the seller, which can appeal “to the heart can make your offer stand out,” said NerdWallet.

But acting during a time when others may be distracted and not actively searching is perhaps the most effective method of getting what you want. “About one million consumers will purchase a home from November to January this year, when home prices are a bit softer,” said Forbes.

If that sounds like a big number, consider this: “More than 85 percent of buyers who say they plan to buy a home in the next year say they will wait until the spring or summer,” according to data from Realtor.com’s “Top Tips for Home Buyers and Sellers in 2016” survey.

Because you might actually get a deal

No one likes to overpay, regardless of their price point. And multiple offers that drive up home prices are a drag for everyone (but the seller!). If you consider that those who are selling their home during the holidays are generally doing so because they have to, not because they want to, it makes sense that when you do find a house, it might be priced better than anything you’d find months later. In fact, according to The Balance, “Home prices typically drop to a 12-month low” in the month of December.

“Sellers tend to avoid the end of the year due to the short days, wintry weather and conventional wisdom that says buyers are otherwise occupied, Tim Deihl, associate broker at Gibson Sotheby’s International Realty in Boston, told Bankrate. “But those who do choose to sell at year-end are often under pressure and highly motivated to cut a deal. A seller who’s looking to move a piece of real estate during the holidays is a seller who needs to sell, because nobody in their right mind would pick that as the most convenient time to list their property. And that’s why the year-end might be a smart time to buy: Determined house-hunters can take advantage of sellers’ urgency.”

Because what better present could there be?

You might want a new KitchenAid mixer or a flat screen or a weekend getaway. But do any of those things compare to a new home? The answer is no. No, they don’t. If you’re stumped at what to get your honey or your family, or what to ask for, here it is. And, if you time it right, you might even be able to get that home on Christmas Day.

“Almost nobody looks at homes on Christmas Day. It doesn’t matter whether you are a Christian nor whether you celebrate that holiday, there are much lower numbers of buyers shopping for a home in December,” said The Balance. “But buying on or near Christmas Day is a smart move.”

In addition to all the other reasons the Christmas holiday season is so attractive for buyers, “People are in good moods, celebrating, opening presents, enjoying family and, let’s face it, some are a little tipsy,” they said. And, “People are more inclined to be generous, even if it means coming down on the price. Of course, the key is to find a real estate agent who will a) work on Christmas and b) be aggressive enough to worm her way into the seller’s home without batting an eyelash.”

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

View All Homes For Sale In Sun City

Single-family residences are detached homes with front and back yards, a driveway, and an attached carport or garage. Many homes are built on golf course lots which give owners open views of the course and the fairways. Sun City AZ has two man-made lakes that are surrounded by homes and duplex units offering the owners excellent views across the lake. There is also a section in Sun City AZ called Rancho Estates. These are single family homes on acre-size or larger lots with horse privileges. Not all of the Rancho Estates homes currently have access to the recreation facilities in Sun City AZ.

The community has seven recreation centers, eight golf courses, two bowling centers, an outdoor amphitheater, a 33-acre man-made lake, and Duffeeland dog park. Today, over 120 chartered clubs offer something for everyone! Arts and crafts clubs such as stained glass, weavers and knitters, ceramics, quilters, clay, leather craft, china painting, silver craft, lapidary and woodworking are available for those with or without experience. Numerous educational, sports, dance, exercise, music, and card and game clubs are also available. A variety of social clubs, as well as other clubs, such as photography, gardening, and a dog club all provide an excellent opportunity for residents to become active and involved in their community. With literally dozens of clubs, if there is not a one in Sun City AZ that suits your fancy, all you have to do is start one.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

Buying To Renovate: What You Need To Know

If you’re looking for a house that’s not exactly turnkey, you’re not alone. Call it the HGTV effect. Is anyone else OBSESSED with House Hunters Renovation?!

“So you’re thinking of buying a fixer-upper? Maybe you’re a do-it-yourselfer, or you just love this home so much that you don’t mind lavishing extra TLC on it in the years to come,” said U.S. News. “Or perhaps you’re enthralled with home renovation television programs where every home has a camera-ready happy ending.”

Yes, buying a house in need of renovation definitely has its advantages, starting with the ability to make updates that match your style and (hopefully) increase the value of the home. But it also comes with its fair share of challenges. Here’s what you’ll want to know before you make that offer.

Not every home in need of renovation is a diamond in the rough

Some homes might just be too far gone to bring back to life. Or at least too expensive to be a good deal. There is a reason “movie plot lines have been based on the darker idea that rehabilitating a home can result in disaster,” said U.S. News. “Sometimes fixer-uppers turn out to be dismal downers.”

It could be that the house hasn’t been maintained properly and has serious issues that are going to increase the timeline and drive up the renovation costs. Maybe it needs work that’s well beyond your scope – and budget.

renovation

“If the house needs significant structural improvements, many real estate experts recommend avoiding it altogether,” said This Old House. “That’s because major repairs – plumbing and electrical system overhauls, foundation upgrades, and extensive roof and wall work – are usually ‘invisible’ and hardly ever raise the value of the house enough to offset the cost of the renovation.”

Inspection, inspection, inspection

Some homes in need of renovation are purchased as foreclosures or at auction, but the problem therein is that you might have to buy “as is.” That means you don’t get to inspect the home before purchase or request any repairs from the seller when you uncover problems.

It goes without saying that this is an idea that is often frowned upon—especially for those who are inexperienced in home renovation. Buy a home “as is” and you may end up with a great big money pit. Making sure your home is inspected before you purchase can help you see the full picture and decide whether it’s a good buy—or a goodbye.

Think about bringing in an architect and an engineer, too

If you’re planning on knocking down walls (and aren’t we all!), you might want to consider hiring an engineer and/or an architect early on. Structural walls or surprises inside the walls like plumbing or HVAC may make the open floorplan you’re dreaming of unachievable – or at least really expensive. It pays to do your due diligence before you purchase, even if it costs a little more upfront.

Who’s doing the renovating?

Planning on taking on some or all of the renovation yourself? Are you a first-timer, an old pro, or somewhere in between? If the grand total of your experience is patching a few nail holes in your college dorm room, you might want to think about hiring a professional.

Some things, like tiling or installing hardwoods, and some types of demolition, can be taught in a clinic at your local home improvement store, or even on a video on YouTube. Other skills like roofing, plumbing, and electrical work are usually best left to the pros. Keep in mind that, depending on what you plan to do to the house, you may also need permits before any work can begin.

There’s a loan for that

Financing is an important factor when buying any home. A traditional mortgage won’t pay for your repairs and updates, and most people aren’t super excited about shelling out a bunch of cash for renovations on top of their down payment and closing costs.

“If you’re buying a home that needs a little TLC, a typical fixed-rate mortgage isn’t going to help you pay for repairs,” said Interest.com. “Your lender isn’t going to approve a $300,000 loan to buy a home that’s only worth $250,000. And, while homeowners sometimes use home equity loans to remodel, you can’t get a home equity loan when you have no equity. This can be a big obstacle for buyers who don’t have extra cash to make needed renovations or repairs before moving in.”

Thankfully, there is another alternative. Several loans build cash for renovations right into the terms. “Four government-backed loan programs are designed for purchase-remodelers,” said Bankrate:

  • FHA 203(k)
  • Streamlined FHA 203(k)
  • Fannie Mae HomeStyle Renovation mortgage
  • Fannie Mae HomePath mortgage

“Each program bases the loan amount on the value of the home after renovations are complete,” they said. You’ll want to talk to a lender and get preapproved prior to finding a home to streamline the purchase process.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

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