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Position Yourself For Success

The Critical First Two Weeks of Marketing Your Home For Sale

Brokers share their listings with other brokers in the multiple listing service (MLS) under certain rules of cooperation and compensation. One of the rules of cooperation is that each broker and agent make a new listing available to other MLS members within 24 or 48 hours of signing the listing agreement with the seller.

This is to give you, the seller, the greatest chance of selling your home during the first two weeks of marketing. This critical two-week period is your best opportunity to sell your home.

Several key events happen quickly:

1. Your home will be entered into the MLS showing system with your showing instructions, so that other agents can bring their buyers to see your home. While your listing is being prepared for marketing, your agent will contact his or her buyers and inform colleagues of the new listing.

2. Other data such as mapping, satellite image, neighborhood information, tax roll data, school information and other data will be added to your listing so that buyers can get the full picture of what it’s like to live in your home.

3. Your agent will either take photos, or schedule a videographer to help market your home with photos and video. This enables buyers to walk through your home and property virtually, so they can choose or eliminate your home when deciding which home to buy.

4. Your agent may create virtual or printed “feature” sheets that showcase your home’s features to advantage, so buyers can remember it was your home they liked best when it’s time to do side-by-side comparisons.

5. Your agent will schedule your home on the MLS tour for other agents to see, and ask for feedback. The agents who see your home in person are important, as they will be able to report your home’s features and condition to their buyers. Homes in top move-in-ready condition sell faster and for more money.

6. Your agent will distribute your listing data to his or her website or blog, accounts such as Twitter or Instagram, the broker’s website, and third-party sites like Realtor.com, Zillow, or Trulia.

7. Your agent will put a sign in your yard announcing your home is for sale.

8. Your agent may advertise your home in a number of places, including the local newspaper and homes magazines. Your agent may also put your home in their personal marketing tools such as e-magazines, newsletters, or email alerts to prospective buyers.

Anyone who is interested in homes in your price range and area will know your home is available for sale within the first two weeks of marketing.

If you don’t get many showings or offers, chances are good that your home may be facing stiff competition from other homes on the market. They are in a better location, or superior condition or they’re priced more aggressively.

If you don’t have showings within two weeks of listing your home, consult your agent. Perhaps you can do a little more to spruce up your home’s curb appeal, or perhaps stage the interior to better advantage.

Give your home a little more time before you adjust the price. You may be in a buyer’s market with many homes for sale. If so, buyers need more time to sort through the homes on the market.

You don’t want to take chances when marketing your home. Your best chance of selling your home is when it’s new to the market and exciting to buyers. Don’t lose your advantage by overpricing or underpreparing your home for market.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

What You Need To Know Before You Buy In A Planned Community

A particularly active spring storm season left pockmarked roofs and tumbled fences throughout North Texas this year, including many in my master-planned community, thanks to an EF0 tornado that blew its way through the neighborhood (thankfully missing my house – this time). The process of repairs and replacements was as fickle as the tornado itself. Some homeowners received immediate or at least prompt approval from the community Homeowners’ Association (HOA) and its Architectural Review Committee (ARC), while others were forced to wait and wait and wait – which would be frustrating, even if this weren’t the wettest June in 13 years. In one case, a homeowner’s approval was inexplicably delayed so long, even though she was only looking to replace her damaged roof with the exact same roof, that she suffered leaks and damage to the interior of her home.

That’s one of the rubs of living in a community that is governed by an HOA: You need approval to do stuff to your house, even if that stuff is going to be an improvement over what it currently looks like. It’s not the only potential downside, but there are also plenty of advantages associated with an HOA. And with more than 40 million U.S. households “or 53% of the owner-occupied households in the America” living with an HOA, according to HOA-USA – a number that’s on the rise with new construction, of which more than 60% have an HOA – it’s something you might have to deal with. Get to know the pros and cons so there won’t be any surprises.

Pro: An HOA protects your investment. “HOA rules and regulations help ensure homeowners keep their homes well maintained and in compliance with overall appearance standards,” said Signature Homes. “Combined with proper care of amenities and common areas, the value of your home is more protected than one that does not have HOA oversight.”

Con: Limits your creativity and individuality. HOAs may offer limited options when it comes to updates. Older neighborhoods may have a small color palette available to owners and may be reluctant to expand it to current trends.

Pro: You won’t have to deal with neighbors painting their house pink or letting their grass grow to armpit height. “Homes within an HOA must meet the standards set by the association or face a fine, so you’re less likely to see unkempt lawns, peeling paint or a garishly painted house,” said Realtor.com. “Some HOAs have a design review board with the power to approve any changes to your home’s exterior.”

Con: Those restrictions can be Confining. An HOA demands that you ask permission before making any changes to your home – even if you’re just talking about staining your fence the very same color. Depending on how finicky your HOA is, you might also get fined because your landscaper took the week off or because the basketball net in your driveway is torn (true story).

Pro: File this under the umbrella of “protecting your investment.” Many HOAs have stipulations about how many cars, or what type, can be parked on your property, or even where they can be parked. That can help ensure that the neighbor down the street doesn’t turn his lawn into an auto body shop with multiple non-functioning cars up on blocks.

Con: Looking to park your RV or boat in your driveway? An HOA may nix that idea. Be sure you check ahead of time to make sure this is allowed.

Pro: An HOA decision may not be final. Get a rejection from the HOA on your submitted request to make changes to your landscaping? You can always appeal and state your case.

Con: Deciding to “ask for forgiveness instead of permission” rarely goes well, so, if you decide to go ahead with changes despite not receiving an approval from the HOA, beware: You might be fined.

Pro: Some HOAs take care of things like your front-yard landscaping and trash removal, which means you don’t have to pay for it or worry about it.

Con: That also may mean strict restrictions about what you can and can’t plant in your front yard. You may have to reconsider those rose bushes.

Pro: You might not have to put in a pool because there’s one in the community that you’re helping to pay for through your HOA dues, but don’t have to maintain.

Con: When the pool needs to be redone, it’ll be you and all your neighbors that are on the hook to pay for it – even if you never use it.

Pro: A pool is just the beginning. Planned communities with an HOA can have golf courses, tennis courts, clubhouses, playgrounds, and even private lakes for fishing and recreation.

Con: The more amenities you have, the more you’re likely to pay in HOA dues. In a large masterplan with a couple of pools, a playground, and a tennis court, you can pay as little as $50 per month. The more homes that are added, the more the overall cost is spread out. A more “typical range” is $200–400 per month, said Investopedia, adding that, “The more upscale the building and the more amenities it has, the higher the homeowners’ association fees are likely to be.” In some condos, the fees may be higher if parking and security are considerations, and, especially, in a luxury building with amenities including a fitness center and concierge. “Hollywood’s fancy Sierra Towers condo building, which is filled to the brim with amenities like 24-hour concierge service and valet parking. They charge residents of a 3,400-square-foot condo about $4,000 per month in HOA fees,” said Realtor.com.

Pro: You’ve got a built-in mediator. “Involved in a tiff with your neighbor over that big oak tree that’s losing limbs? You can settle some confrontations with your neighbors by taking your grievances to the HOA’s board or management company,” said RISMedia.

Con: Maybe you’re the type that wants to “handle” grievances in your own way?

Pro: Some HOAs allow you to pay monthly, quarterly, or annually.

Con: Falling behind on HOA dues can lead to foreclosure. “This is another reason you’ll want to make sure those HOA fees are in your budget,” said Credit.com. “An HOA can move to foreclose on your property if you fail to pay its dues and/or associated late fees. Laws can vary by state. A few, for instance, place limits on when an HOA can move to foreclose. So if you’ve fallen behind on payments, you may want to consult a local attorney about your best recourse.”

Pro: Part of what you’ll pay to the HOA every month goes to a reserve fund, which can be used for neighborhood repairs and emergency needs.

Con: The reserves may not be enough to cover large expenses. “In addition to monthly fees, if a major expense such as a new roof or a new elevator comes up and there aren’t enough funds in the HOA’s reserves to pay for it, the association may charge an extra assessment that can run into thousands of dollars,” said Investopedia.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

Protectecting Yourself During a Move

“I can’t wait to move!”

How often do you hear someone say that? What they mean is they can’t wait to be in their new place, all unpacked and organized and enjoying their new surroundings.

What they don’t mean is, “I can’t wait to spend a month packing up everything I own and hauling it into a truck we’re going to drive across country when I’ve never driven anything larger than a mid-sized sedan, only to have to haul it all out, and into that new house. The new house that has two flights of stairs and narrow hallways. Don’t get me started on unpacking boxes.”

And what they REALLY don’t mean is, “I can’t wait for the movers to break a bunch of my things and lose a bunch of stuff.” Pretty sure they also don’t mean, “I can’t wait for dishonest movers to delay my delivery and charge me quadruple my quote and then hold all my stuff hostage while I sit here helpless.”

Think that could never happen to you?

“Last year, Massachusetts officials sued one moving company and New Jersey officials sued two for providing low-ball estimates and then grossly inflating fees after loading the trucks,” said Consumer Reports. “One of the companies had threatened to auction the possessions of customers who didn’t pay.”

Added MarketWatch about the possibility of mover fraud: “Typically, a mover gives you an extremely low estimate over the phone or Internet without ever actually seeing what needs to be moved. You agree, they show up, load the truck with all your worldly possessions and then tell you it will actually cost a lot more. Then, they hold everything you own hostage on their truck until you cough up the extra cash.”

Yes, moving can be fraught with challenge and frustration and even heartache. So how do you protect yourself? Here are some tips for a safe and fraud-free move.

Do your research

Proper preparation can help you ward off many of the issues that can turn a move into a nightmare, and that’s starts with a healthy dose of research. You always want to ask for a referral rather than using an unknown. And not just anyone is qualified to give a referral, according to MSN.

“Ask your real-estate agent. The general consensus among moving professionals is that word of mouth is the best way to find a good mover,” they said. “Real-estate agents know the ins and outs of the housing industry and are the most reliable sources. Realtors want to make sure that your (moving) transaction is a good one.”

There are also websites dedicated to moving scams. “MovingScam.com maintains a ‘black list,'” they said, as well as a “message board filled with consumer experiences, bad and good.”

Verify licensing and look for complaints

MSN recommends people who are moving investigate the companies they are looking at using. Interstate movers must be licensed by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.

“Check with your area’s Better Business Bureau to see if any complaints have been filed and whether there are reliable,” they said.

Protect Your Move also provides info on whether a mover’s license is current “and if the company has ever had a federal complaint.”

Watch out for the lowball bid

“You get what you paid for” is often a dangerous reality when it comes to moving. To protect yourself against unethical movers, get several estimates and make sure to weed out any that seem too low. Yes, the desire to save money is strong. But an unusually low bid is often a red flag.

“When shopping for movers, it’s best to get at least three estimates, ” said MSN. “If you’ve got one that’s really, really low compared to the other two, you’re going to know something’s up.”

Have a contingency plan

No matter how well you prepare, the unexpected can still happen. What if the truck doesn’t show up on time? Are you prepared to live without your things for a few days, or longer? Make sure you pack a bag of essentials you can have with you while the rest of your stuff is stuck on the truck.

Protect yourself

The Better Business Bureau suggests paying a little extra for peace of mind.

“Consider accepting full value protection. It may cost a few dollars more up front, but it can eliminate headaches after your move,” they said. “Purchasing full (replacement) value protection from your mover means any lost or damaged articles will be repaired or replaced, or a cash settlement will be made to repair the item or to replace it at its current market value, regardless of age. The cost of full value protection must be included in the initial estimate you receive for an interstate move.”

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

Three Things Home Buyers Should Never Do

Misunderstandings, problems, or shortcomings in the buying process many need correction to end negative results. This is not about blame, but learning how to proceed constructively:

  • Buyers who begin homeownership out of their financial depth are not on the path to success or happiness. Sticking to your budget is not losing out, but progressing sanely.
  • Research-savvy buyers, who ask questions and uncover deal-breaker property weaknesses will not end up as extremely-disappointed property owners faced with expensive problems to correct or law suits to fight.
    Home buyers will be rewarded by remembering that there are three things never to forget when buying real estate:

#1: Never quit: Real estate values continue to rise — rarely getting cheaper. Give up and you end up with nothing. If you quit, you’ll join the ranks of those who spend the rest of their lives talking about the real estate that got away. I’ve heard so many stories about properties that people almost bought or always wanted to buy. When I ask what happened, they usually don’t know. Many say they just gave up. “I guess it was not meant to be” is a common answer. Don’t let this be you. If you’re losing out on offers, find out exactly why.

  • Most sellers care about who buys their home and will make new memories there. Personalize your offer with a video or unique offer. One enterprising chef offered to come and cook dinner for the owners once the offer was accepted. A couple’s short, punchy video showed what they had gone through to find that house and what they dreamed about doing there… all with magazine pictures cut out by their kids. You may not be creative, but be sincere with a letter or short video (less than a minute or two) that your real estate professional can use to introduce you and your offer to purchase.
  • The real estate market may change as you continue shopping. If prices rise, you may end up in the wrong price range. Explore other locations and types of housing. Buying a two- or three-unit income property may give you the financial leverage you need for the area you prefer.
  • Your relationship with your real estate professional may not be working to your advantage. What’s missing? Is it time to quit that relationship, not the buying project?

#2: Never rely on verbals.: Verbal assurances from sellers, home inspectors, or real estate professionals are worth the paper they are printed on! In real estate, it’s what’s on paper that counts[&mdash]what you can rove indisputably in a disagreement or in court.

  • Sellers may say they’ll leave all the appliances, playground equipment, or anything else. If you really want something, include it in the offer with a description that precludes substitution with lesser models.
  • The real estate professional may assure you about many things the sellers will do or not do before closing. If something matters to you, make sure it is written into the offer, so there is no doubt what will be done, to what standards, when, and at who’s cost. Repairing the roof, finishing the bathroom renovation, cutting deadwood out of tall trees…all in writing in the offer.
  • If there’s something of specific value to you on the property, make sure it will remain intact. For instance, a stand of trees was assumed by one buyer to be a permanent fixture. The sellers thought that, since they’d grown the trees, they could harvest the trees as firewood as part of packing to move. What did the offer say on the subject?
  • The builder’s sales staff want to expedite your new home sale, but they may not have the power to make binding promises, warranties, or guarantees. Be sure you get the home you expect, by having details that matter to you written into the offer. Read the entire offer[—]yes all the small print. If you can’t follow the clauses, ask your real estate professional. Translating legalese for clients is a prime function for these professionals. Check important issues and clauses with your real estate lawyer. If you only want the house if it has a three-car garage, not a two-car, it’s vital to get that commitment from the builder into the offer in the correct way to overcome any sidestepping made allowable by the small print.

#3: Never think the work is over once the offer is accepted: Having your offer to purchase accepted is terrific! Hurrah! However, until closing, the house belongs to the seller and a lot can happen.

  • The seller is responsible for insuring the property and keeping it in good repair until closing.
  • Will the lender have all the mortgage funds ready for you on closing?
  • Both sides of the transaction need their lawyers tidying up loose ends. You’ll be busy with movers and perhaps school transfers.

Things can go wrong. I’m not trying to stress you out, but keep in touch with your real estate professional to be sure they are in touch with those finalizing the many details that must be resolved before closing. That’s not calling everyday in a panic. Clarify what details must be taken care of before closing. Then check off that list with your real estate professional, so nothing is left to the last minute. Once you get the keys and move in there may be carryover issues. Remain calm. Document the issues. Never quit until issues are completely resolved. Never rely on verbal assurances. Insist on written sign-offs, warranties, and receipts.

The First Offer May Be The Best Offer

Sometimes when everything goes right we have trouble accepting that fact. Perhaps nowhere is this phenomenon more clearly illustrated than in the case where a seller receives a good offer right away.

The annals of real estate are well stocked with stories of sellers who refused to take a good, but not perfect, first offer, and who then waited a long, long time before finally accepting something else at a considerably lower price. And most agents who have been around for a while know to shudder when a good strong offer is made almost at the outset of a listing; for the seller’s reservations are almost inevitable. “Did we list it too low?” “If someone will offer this much so soon, maybe we should wait a while and see if we can get more.” Etc.

When we read of Silicon Valley listings routinely selling at above list price, and while we are still in a period when multiple-offer situations are commonplace, it is understandable that such thoughts come to mind. Nonetheless, they are generally unfounded, especially if the market is anywhere near “normal”, as ours is today.

As an antidote to the ill effects of the “curse of the first offer”, a couple of observations might be kept in mind.

First, the fact that an offer is received early in the listing period — even in the first few days — doesn’t mean that the property has been listed too low.

It is easy to overlook how very efficient the residential real estate marketplace has become. Modern multiple listing systems (MLS) provide agents, and thus their buyer clients, with virtually instant access to information about existing inventory and about what has newly come on the market. In the old, old days a buyer’s agent did not become aware of new listings until “the book” (i.e. the compilation of MLS listings) was published. There might have been a lag time of ten days or more from the time the listing was taken.

Today, a good buyer’s agent will have electronically entered a “profile” of his client’s needs and price range into the system. Then, whenever he logs on to the MLS, he will be notified if a listing has been entered that matches that profile. In a low-inventory market such as we have had recently, buyers’ agents will log on a half-dozen times a day, or more, to see if an appropriate new listing has been entered. Moreover, in most systems the buyer’s agent is able to place the buyer himself on a similar notification.

The point is that potential buyers learn quickly of the existence of an appropriate new listing. Thus a flurry of activity at the outset of the listing does not necessarily imply a too-low price; rather, it reflects the efficiency of the system.

Secondly, an early first offer does not imply that the seller should hold out for full price.

We all know that there is typically a bit of a dance in the pricing and negotiating for a property. Sellers, with the concurrence of their agents, will usually list their property for an amount that is both higher than what they believe its value to be and higher than what they would be satisfied to receive. Why? Because they know that buyers almost always want and expect to pay less than the listed price

However, when an otherwise acceptable offer comes in near the outset of a listing period, sellers are frequently tempted to hold out for full price, or much closer to it than would normally be expected. Caution should be exercised in this regard.

For one thing, as we have noted, exposure of the property to buyers occurs pretty quickly nowadays, and sellers shouldn’t assume that there are going to be more, much less higher, offers as the listing period progresses.

Secondly, there often can be a transactional benefit to “leaving something on the table.” A real estate transaction is a process. These days, with inspections and disclosures, there are almost always “second negotiations” during the course of escrow. A buyer who feels ground down in the purchase negotiation may well be more difficult to deal with as other issues arise.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

3 Steps To Saving For Your Dream Home

According to Harvard University’s “State of the Nation’s Housing” report, while more people than ever before want to own their own home, fewer feel financially ready to do so yet. Reasons range from high rents to student loan debt.

Saving For Down

Millennials, in particular, are waiting longer to get married, start families and purchase their first home. But this is not necessarily bad news for the housing market. In fact, it could mean that the millennial generation has something to teach us all about saving consistently towards a big life goal such as owning your own home!

In this article, learn three important steps to take when you start saving for your dream home.

Step 1: Pay down your debt to clean up your credit.

Your credit score is a tricky business when it comes to saving for your first home. You have no history of carrying a mortgage, so you can’t make any real impact there. What you can do is to clean up your overall credit report so your general credit score is as healthy as possible before you apply for your mortgage loan.

According to the National Foundation for Credit Counseling (NFCC), a surprising number of Americans think they have “above average” (60 percent) to “very good” (41 percent) credit, although a full 48 percent have not seen their credit score in the past three years or ever.

So clearly, this is where you need to start. The best way to differentiate yourself from your competition (other people who are trying to convince a direct lender to give them a mortgage loan) is to pay down your debt, clear up any disputes on your credit report and, in so doing, boost your credit score so you can qualify for the best mortgage at the lowest interest rates.

Step 2: Separate and automate your savings.

Saving money is never going to be the easiest goal you attempt. In fact, according to The Atlantic, one of the chief reasons that nearly half of all Americans have little or no emergency savings to fall back on is taking on too much mortgage debt.

So here is a clear area where you should proceed with caution. First, save. Then, buy a home. The best approach to make saving as painless as possible for you is to automate your savings. You can do this by setting up direct deposit on your paycheck and then regular auto-drafts into a savings account reserved just for dream home savings. This way, you never even touch those funds and feel tempted to spend them instead.

Step 3: Downsize to upsize.

Finally, one effective change many adults today are making to save more towards their dream home is to downsize while they save. This can mean anything from moving to a smaller apartment to getting rid of your cable television subscription. Also, you must continually remind yourself why you have downsized in order for this step to work well.

But the key to making downsizing work to serve your greater goals is to make sure you deposit every cent of what you save into your dream home fund. Referring back to Step 2 here, the easiest way to do this is to calculate for yourself exactly what you are saving by paying less rent, giving up cable, etc., and then setting up a monthly auto draft in that amount to deposit directly into your dream home savings account.

By following these three steps, you can make tangible financial progress in saving to buy your dream home. If you can save 20 percent towards a downpayment, you can avoid paying expensive Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) and you may even qualify for a lower interest rate. Scrimping and saving is never fun or easy, but it will be worth it when your realtor hands you that brand-new set of house keys!

View All Sonoran Mountain Ranch Homes for Sale

Secluded in the foothills of North Peoria you will find the high desert setting breathtaking. Designed to preserve that setting, Sonoran Mountain Ranch offers a community that is harmonious to the desert backdrop. Extensive preserve spaces and washes offer many view lots for home sites. A wide variety of builders ensure there is something for everyone, including high end luxury homes by Camelot, as well as a custom home gated enclave set into the hillside.

Combined with access that gets you places quickly and amenities nearby, you have the best of both worlds at your fingertips. Hiking trails lead up the mountain side right from the sidewalks, lots of bike paths and walking trails complement the trails. The community has a large park area as well as assorted greenbelt and tot lots. There is land dedicated to a K-8 school at some point in the future. The community features approx. 1500 homes and/or lots. Homes here were built from 2004 to present. The community is nearing build out, but there are still opportunities to for a brand new home.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

5 Ways to Find The Right Movers When Moving Into a New Home

They say that the sun never sleeps in Phoenix, which is why moving there can be an exciting experience. However, there are a lot of things to take care of when moving. You need to find the perfect neighborhood and think about the stuff like which extra features are worth the money. In the rush of moving, many fail to focus on a crucial detail – finding the right moving company.

Movers can become an essential part of your moving experience. They can make the entire process a breeze or turn it into a nightmare. Don’t forget that they will be handling all your possessions, which is why you need to find a company you can trust. Take a look at 5 ways to find the right movers when moving into a new home in Phoenix:

Make Sure Your Movers Are Full-Time Professionals
Moving companies often hire sub-contractors that work part-time and come and go as they please. They are not a good choice because they lack skills and motivation to do the job the right way. Instead, you need to ensure that full-time professionals will handle your moving into a new home.

When you find an experienced team of professional movers, you know that you and your possessions will be treated with the utmost respect and courtesy. A professional crew of movers is well-coordinated, and they all feel like a part of the company. That guarantees that they will handle the move swiftly and with care. You can make the experience of moving in Phoenix even easier if you apply these tips from Low Budget Movers.

The Moving Company Must Provide Insurance Information
Regardless of how careful the movers are, accidents can happen. That is why you should make sure that your belongings are protected in case anything goes wrong. Any reputable moving company will be ready to provide insurance information upon your request.

There are various types of insurance movers can offer. Replacement insurance guarantees that your items will be replaced if they are damaged. Reputable movers also provide extra coverage for antiques and other expensive items.

Get Written Estimates from Several Companies
It might seem that the first movers you came across are the right choice, but make sure you get written estimates from several companies. If you’re getting an estimate over the phone or online, you should be as detailed as possible when telling about your moving needs.

Always ask movers to precisely explain what you are getting for the quoted fee. Beware of hidden expenses that can be made up along the way, such as travel, fuel or stair fees. When you narrow your options to a couple of moving companies, it might be a good idea to call them to visit you and make the final estimate.

Do the Research
You should put on your detective hat and inspect the reputation of the moving company you want to hire. First of all, you should make sure that it is a well-known company, so stay clear of those suspicious movers from Craigslist. After all, you don’t want just anyone handling your valuable possessions.

Any reputable company will have an updated website with its list of services. You can start there and move on to their social media pages to read comments from previous clients. A high BBB (Better Business Bureau) rating is also a sign of a reputable moving company, as well as any other reviews you can find online. Don’t worry if you run into a bad review or two; the important thing is that the majority of them are positive.

Ask Questions:
You should ask all sorts of questions to find out more about the movers. These include:

  • How long has the company been in business?
  • Do they provide a guarantee that the delivery will be completed on the desired date?
  • Do they run background checks on their movers?
  • Do they have their own equipment or rent a moving van?
  • Can the movers disassemble and assemble furniture?

Reputable companies understand the importance of establishing a relationship with the client. That is why they will be prepared to answer any questions you might have with ease and provide clear and detailed answers.

In the end, it is important to realize that choosing the right movers is an essential part of moving in Phoenix – and anywhere else. It might take a bit time and effort, but it will prove to be a wise investment. By selecting the right moving company, you will prevent any possible problems that may occur during the process.

For a list of moving companies we recommend please give us a call at 480-213-5251 or visit lowbudgetmovers.net.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

IS NOW THE BEST TIME EVER TO BUY YOUR FIRST HOME?

If you’ve been thinking about buying your first home, talk of rising mortgage rates may have you worried. But, the reality is that this may be one of the best opportunities for first-time buyers in recent memory. Conditions were already good for first-timers with new, super-low down payment loans. But the FHA’s announcement that they would be cutting mortgage-insurance premiums makes buying even more advantageous.

“The annual fees the Federal Housing Administration charges to guarantee mortgages it backs are being cut by a quarter of a percentage point,” said Bloomberg of a statement released by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). “With the reduction, the annual cost for most borrowers will be 0.60 percent of the loan balance.”

According to HUD, “The fee cut would save new FHA-insured homeowners an average of $500 this year. The cut would take effect on Jan. 27.”

What other factors should you be paying attention to if you’re looking to buy your first home?

Mortgage rates

Yes, rates are up from their lowest point. But the average 30-year fixed-mortgage rate right now is 4 percent, down a bit this week and waaaaaay down from decades ago when they were in the teens. You’ll pay a few bucks more per month now than you would have at this time last year, but, if you’re getting an FHA loan, those new mortgage interest cuts will help.

first time homebuyer 2

More than anything, it’s important to be realistic. We’re not anywhere near gloom-and-doom time, despite some of the more hysterical talk out there. In fact, today’s rates are still near historic lows, which make buying a home more affordable than rent in many cities.

But, if you need to find a way to lower your monthly payment on your future home, and you’re not eager to search for less expensive homes, remember that your credit helps determine your mortgage-worthiness, and the better it is, the better your interest rate. If you’re not being offered the best rate out there, it’s time to…

Get your credit in order

Have great credit? Great! Your lender will be pleased and, presumably, you will be, too. But many of us need some help in this area, and even a small bump in your score can make a big difference not just to the rate you get but also whether you will qualify for a loan at all.

“The homebuyer’s credit score is among the most important factors when it comes to qualifying for a loan these days,” said Bankrate. Your lender will be able to give you tips for improving your score, which can range from checking your report for errors to paying off old delinquent accounts.

It’s also important to keep in mind that what you consider to be responsible credit management may not necessarily be seen as a positive when you go to qualify for a loan. “Just because you pay everything on time every month doesn’t mean your credit is stellar,” they said. “The amount of credit you’re using relative to your available credit limit, or your credit utilization ratio, can sink a credit score. The lower the utilization rate, the higher your score will be. Ideally, first-time homebuyers would have a lot of credit available, with less than a third of it used.”

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Low down payment loans

Please visit the mortgage section of our web site for a list of low down payment loan programs.

Investigate situation-specific loans

Are you a veteran, a police officer, or a firefighter? There may be a special loan for you with conditions that can make purchasing a home easier and more affordable. There are also specific loans for those who are buying a home that has (or needs) energy-efficient features, one that can be bundled with home improvement funds, and another from the USDA that can save those who are moving to a rural area money.

“This one may surprise you,” said nerdwallet. “The U.S. Department of Agriculture has a homebuyers assistance program. And no, you don’t have to live on a farm. The program targets rural areas and allows 100% financing by offering lenders mortgage guarantees. There are income limitations, which vary by region.”

7 IMPORTANT STEPS TO HELP YOU BUY YOUR FIRST HOME IN 2017

Thinking about buying your first home? What an exciting time this is bound to be. And, also, what a (potentially) overwhelming, confusing, and stress-filled time. It can easily veer into scary territory if you’re not prepared and not surrounding yourself with professionals who can help guide you in the right direction.

These seven tips can help you make that dream of homeownership come true in 2017.

1. Work with the right real estate agent

The guy next door or your brother’s girlfriend’s cousin who just got his real estate license may be hungry to get your business, but that doesn’t mean he’s your best bet. An experienced agent quite simply knows things that someone who is brand new probably doesn’t. An experienced agent will also have important relationships in place that may be able to help buyers in every facet of the home purchase, including:

  • Finding houses that aren’t even listed yet
  • Finding homes that may be slightly outside of a buyer’s criteria but that are worthy of consideration
  • Leveraging industry relationships to get you great deals or better terms
  • Managing appraisals and inspections
  • Working through every step of the purchase process and handling any issues that pop up along the way
  • Negotiating a deal that works for both sides

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2. Don’t be afraid to talk to multiple lenders

Your Realtor will most likely have several lenders they have worked with and can refer you to. You may also want to speak to loved ones and get a referral or two from someone they’ve worked with successfully. Each lender may have a different recommendation and/or knowledge of a special loan that works for you, so it makes sense to look at a few different options.

3. Mind your credit

Many people have no idea what their credit score is, but if you’re thinking about buying a home, knowledge is power. Different loans have different minimum credit score requirements, and it could be that your score doesn’t measure up for the best loan rates, or maybe you need to do some work to qualify for even the most lenient loan.

A good mortgage lender can advise you on your best options to raise your score, from removing any errors on your credit report, to paying any delinquent accounts, to exploring credit repair options. The earlier you learn your score and delve into the details with a qualified lender, the more time you have to address any issues you find.

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4. Save, save, save

For many people, getting the down payment together is the hardest part of buying a home. And the closing costs can be an unwelcome surprise for those who weren’t expecting to have to come up with even more cash. When you first set out to buy a home, make sure you know how much you have to save. Your lender should be able to give you a pretty good ballpark based on a certain home price. Housing experts recommend adding 5% to that number just to be safe.

Even if you’ve never been a great saver in the past, there are strategies you can use that will help you build the nest egg you need for your down payment and closing costs, including these tips from nerdwallet:

  • Automatic transfers from your checking account to your savings can help to make the process mandatory – and maybe a little less painful.
  • Save raises and bonuses rather than spending them.
  • Set aside tax refunds.
  • Keep the change. At least a couple of banks have variations on this theme. For example, Bank of America allows debit card users to sign up for a service that rounds up purchases to the nearest dollar and puts the change into a linked savings account.
  • Visualize your goal. Slap big, beautiful photos of your dream house on the refrigerator, near your office workspace – and wrap a small one around the primary credit card in your wallet. You might charge less and save more.”

As for where to put that money while you watch it grow, experts recommend that “If the plan is to become a homeowner in the next 12 months, the money should be kept completely liquid. That means you can easily access it at any time,” said CNN Money. “The best way to do that is in a good old-fashioned savings account, Schulte said. Look for one with a higher yield. In today’s low rate environment, that probably means an online-only account like Ally or Synchrony Bank, which currently pay around 1% annually.”

5. Lock in your rate

Rates can be unpredictable. Locking in a rate when you get close to buying, which your lender will undoubtedly recommend, can protect you if rates rise. Many lenders also offer a one-time adjustment in case rates go down.

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6. Stay at your job

Not happy at work and thinking about making a change? If you’re looking to buy a home, you may have to delay that plan. Part of your qualification for a mortgage will be based on your job history. Making a big change just before you buy or during the escrow process will be problematic. Lenders advise buyers to stay the course until after the home closes escrow.

7. Don’t open new credit cards or buy a new car

Your lender will spell out the do’s and don’ts of how to protect your credit when trying to buy a house, but if you haven’t yet talked to anyone and you think you’re getting close to be purchase-ready, that Kohl’s card you take out to save 20% on your $100 bill could cost you. Before you take out any new debt, check with a lender.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

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