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The 5 Most Common Reasons Tenants Leave Your Rentals

Why are renters leaving your units? What can you do about it?

Tenants are on the move. What are the most common reasons they may leave your rentals? How can landlords prevent these moves to keep good tenants, maintain consistent cash flow, and maximize cash flow?

The 5 Most Common Reasons Tenants Leave Your Rentals

1. They want to move somewhere cheaper.
Housing costs, especially rents, have been rising for the last five years. Some are just at the point where it makes sense to move somewhere cheaper where renters can get a lot more for their money. It could be that local rents have just gotten too high—or maybe your rents, in particular, are too high.

Market rents change over time. Be sure you stay tuned into local trends, even when you aren’t actively looking for tenants. If neighboring properties are leasing for 30% less than yours, that could become an issue. Price your properties right. Invest in stable and upcoming locations with more room for growth.

2. They’re afraid of changes in the rental situation.
Sometimes tenants leave just because they are afraid. They may be afraid of how much they think you are going to raise the rent when it comes time to renew. They could be afraid you are going to evict them because they’ve fallen a few days behind on rent a couple times. Or it could be that a tough new property manager you’ve brought in is causing panic in the renters.

Set clear expectations. Get feedback from loyal, long-term renters you trust when you bring in new management, connect with them about renewing leases early, and maintain property upkeep to show tenants you’re a caring landlord, not a slumlord.

3. They need more space.
Between a growing number of multigenerational households and Millennials’ growing families, many simply need more space today. A lot of people jumped on the minimalist lifestyle after 2008, but now, years later, they are tired of living so tightly and cramped. In fact, a Realtor.com survey shows that this is driving far more Millennials and Boomers to choose single family homes in the suburbs over homes in dense urban centers or condos.

4. They want to buy a home.
With rents more expensive than mortgage costs in many areas, interest rates low, and credit scores recovering, many are making the leap to buy homes while it is still so attractive. If you can’t stop it, make the best of it. Ensure a good exit service. Return deposits and ask for a review on the spot. Still, if you can, get them to buy their home from you.

5. They don’t like the neighbors.
No one likes scary or abusive neighbors—and they are out there. This is something to keep in mind when searching and screening rental properties. It is also important to keep lines of communication open and to listen to these complaints. If there are problem tenants in your own neighboring units, you probably won’t renew their leases. If they belong to another landlord, you may want to preempt issues by contacting the other landlord.

Summary
There are a number of reasons good tenants can leave, even if they like the units they are in. Smart landlords will get out in front of these issues and find ways to keep those tenants in their property to avoid turnover costs.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

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