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If You Have the Option of Putting More Money Down, Should You?

With the exception of the VA and USDA programs, along with certain down payment assistance programs, most every residential loan program does indeed require some sort of a down payment. Many borrowers want to come to the closing table with as little cash as possible and as the down payment amount is the largest chunk of change needed, the lowest down payment is often the request. A conventional loan can ask for a down payment of just 5.0 percent with certain first time buyers loans asking for a 3.0 percent down payment. FHA loans need a minimum down payment of just 3.5 percent of the sales price. But if you have more money to put into the transaction, should you?

Many times, this additional cash comes from the sale of a previous residence but of course it doesn’t have to. While conventional loans do have low down payment options, with a down payment of less than 20 percent of the sales price, private mortgage insurance will be required. Making a down payment of 20 percent or more eliminates the need for PMI. A larger down payment obviously results in a lower monthly payment which is another factor to consider.

Making a large down payment will also affect liquidity. A down payment is instant equity in a real estate transaction, the only way to get the money back is either through the sale of the property or an equity loan of some sort. Putting more money down often means tapping into a retirement account such as an IRA or pulling funds from any investment or savings account. When those funds are removed, interest is lost. A larger than required down payment could also mean the funds would be put to use in a better way such as paying down consumer debt or paying off student loans, for example.

Considering an existing mortgage, loan programs today allow you to pay the loan down. Perhaps retirement is soon coming into the picture and paying down a mortgage is a solid financial plan. One thing to note however is that with a loan carrying a fixed interest rate, the payment will not change, just the loan amount will be lowered. With an adjustable rate loan however, the monthly payments will change as the loan amounts are reduced.

Coming in with a large down payment is a personal financial decision and for most that means it’s time for a talk with a financial planner and your loan officer. There are multiple considerations when paying extra on a mortgage or coming to the settlement table with a larger-then-required down payment which means seeking advice from a professional.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

Scary Issues That Can Kill Your New Home Joy

Be afraid. Be very afraid. That new home you’re thinking of buying might not be as perfect as you think. Danger lurks behind every wall. Or maybe just one. Either way, it’s probably something you should know about.

Buying a home is full of challenges, and the one that might be the most frustrating of all is finding out there’s something wrong after you’ve already closed escrow. In many cases, you may have recourse against the seller if there is an issue that wasn’t disclosed, or against the home inspector if he or she missed something serious. But even recompense, you’re still left with a problem you have to deal with when all you want is to be enjoying your new home.

Here are eight things to look for before signing on the dotted line.

It smells moist
If you tour a home on a rainy day, don’t automatically think that the moist smell is because of the weather. If it smells moist inside, you’ll definitely want to make a return trip when the rain has passed to make sure there’s no moisture issue in the house.

There’s a telltale pet odor
That could mean damage to carpet or floors. It might be something you can work out while negotiating, but you definitely want to be aware of what you’re dealing with so that there are no surprises later on, like pet urine that has seeped down through the wood floors into your sub floor, costing you thousands.

The neighborhood is iffy
Maybe there’s more crime than you’re comfortable with or too much of a commercial presence. It’s all about what’s acceptable to you.

Neighbors’ homes are unkempt
If you’re not looking in an area that has a homeowners’ association, pay special attention to what the neighbors’ homes look like. If you’re seeing curious paint choices, cars on the lawn, and grass that’s waist-high, you might want to think hard about whether this is the neighborhood for you. Some buyers appreciate the character of a neighborhood but doesn’t have the strict rules governing what they can and can’t do. But a neighborhood without an HOA can also have issues when neighbors don’t take care of their homes, and this can affect your property values.

It took you a long time to get there
Have a serious conversation with yourself about how much is too much when it comes to the commute. If it took you an hour and a half to get there from work, is this something you can live with every day?

It’s dirty
There are times when a home goes in the market and it’s clear the seller didn’t make the effort to get it in shape prior to listing. It’s not just about a lack of updates but a lack of upkeep, as well. While you may not know the circumstances behind the home, and while it may seem like a great deal if you can get it for a good price, be cautious. A home that is in bad shape on the surface may have a bunch of issues you can’t see.

It’s dark in the house
Sellers will typically open up all shades and blinds and turn on all the lights for showings, but nothing is stopping you from flipping those light switches off to see what the natural light situation is really like. If the place is dark even with all the blinds open and lights on and natural light is really important to you, it might not be the house for you.

It’s too perfect
A home that’s really well staged can look super appealing. But buyers have to train themselves to look at the home, not the furniture and furnishings. What will the house look like without that staged furniture? Does the floorplan work for you? Are the pieces scaled for the room or for real families? Are there any curious configurations like a chair blocking access to a fireplace. Getting past the stager’s tricks to see the house for what it is will help you to decide if it’s really for you.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

New Appraisal Rule: What Does It Mean for You?

A new home appraisal rule just went into effect—the first time in 25 years that “federal regulators have increased the property value limit of the homes that require an appraisal as part of the selling process,” said REALTOR® Magazine. The rule exempts some home sales priced at $400,000 and below from requiring an appraisal. That figure was previously capped at $250,000. “The new rules likely apply to about 40% of home sales, regulators estimate.”

So how will this affect home buyers and sellers? First, it should be noted that those homes that do receive the exemption still have to be evaluated “to provide an estimate of the market value of real estate collateral,” said Housingwire. “The agencies state that the evaluation must be ‘consistent with safe and sound banking practices.’ To that point, the rule establishes that an evaluation “should contain sufficient information and analysis to support the regulated institution’s decision to engage in the transaction.”

Also, the new exemption is not applicable for homes using FHA, HUD, VA, Fannie Mae, or Freddie Mac financing, which eliminates a huge percentage of homes right off the top.

If you are in a position to buy or sell a home that no longer needs an appraisal, should you still proceed with one? Here’s why you may want to consider it.

What is an appraisal?
“A home appraisal is an unbiased determination of the fair market value of the home by a professionally-trained third party,” said Forbes. “While that may sound complicated, all it means is that it’s a chance for someone who’s not personally involved in the sale of the home to give a true representation of the home’s worth. It’s worth noting that an appraisal is entirely separate from a home inspection. The former deals with the financial value of your new home. The latter is an inspection of the functional quality of your home’s systems, like HVAC and plumbing.”

There are a number of factors that contribute to that fair market value. “In a purchase-and-sale transaction, an appraisal is used to determine whether the home’s contract price is appropriate given the home’s condition, location, and features,” said Investopedia. While the evaluation process is intended to provide guidance when it comes to pricing, it is unknown at this point how those evaluations will compare to appraisals, if they will carry the same weight in terms of establishing home value, if they will disproportionately favor the lender, etc.

Value protection
Buyers and sellers each have a vested interest (literally) in knowing how much the home they are buying or selling is worth. For sellers, an appraisal can help inform the listing price, and may also be able to help a seller justify a higher listing price because of improvements they have made to the home.

On the other hand, if a home appraises for less than the sales price, buyers have a negotiating tool. “An appraisal is important because it protects your investment,” said Forbes. “It’s there to ensure that, as the buyer, you don’t pay more than the home is actually worth. It’s also important for securing financing. In today’s mortgage industry a bank will only give you a loan up to the fair market value of the home. Therefore, if an appraisal comes back lower than the purchase price, the lender may only issue you a loan for the appraised amount.”

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

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