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Scary Issues That Can Kill Your New Home Joy

Be afraid. Be very afraid. That new home you’re thinking of buying might not be as perfect as you think. Danger lurks behind every wall. Or maybe just one. Either way, it’s probably something you should know about.

Buying a home is full of challenges, and the one that might be the most frustrating of all is finding out there’s something wrong after you’ve already closed escrow. In many cases, you may have recourse against the seller if there is an issue that wasn’t disclosed, or against the home inspector if he or she missed something serious. But even recompense, you’re still left with a problem you have to deal with when all you want is to be enjoying your new home.

Here are eight things to look for before signing on the dotted line.

It smells moist
If you tour a home on a rainy day, don’t automatically think that the moist smell is because of the weather. If it smells moist inside, you’ll definitely want to make a return trip when the rain has passed to make sure there’s no moisture issue in the house.

There’s a telltale pet odor
That could mean damage to carpet or floors. It might be something you can work out while negotiating, but you definitely want to be aware of what you’re dealing with so that there are no surprises later on, like pet urine that has seeped down through the wood floors into your sub floor, costing you thousands.

The neighborhood is iffy
Maybe there’s more crime than you’re comfortable with or too much of a commercial presence. It’s all about what’s acceptable to you.

Neighbors’ homes are unkempt
If you’re not looking in an area that has a homeowners’ association, pay special attention to what the neighbors’ homes look like. If you’re seeing curious paint choices, cars on the lawn, and grass that’s waist-high, you might want to think hard about whether this is the neighborhood for you. Some buyers appreciate the character of a neighborhood but doesn’t have the strict rules governing what they can and can’t do. But a neighborhood without an HOA can also have issues when neighbors don’t take care of their homes, and this can affect your property values.

It took you a long time to get there
Have a serious conversation with yourself about how much is too much when it comes to the commute. If it took you an hour and a half to get there from work, is this something you can live with every day?

It’s dirty
There are times when a home goes in the market and it’s clear the seller didn’t make the effort to get it in shape prior to listing. It’s not just about a lack of updates but a lack of upkeep, as well. While you may not know the circumstances behind the home, and while it may seem like a great deal if you can get it for a good price, be cautious. A home that is in bad shape on the surface may have a bunch of issues you can’t see.

It’s dark in the house
Sellers will typically open up all shades and blinds and turn on all the lights for showings, but nothing is stopping you from flipping those light switches off to see what the natural light situation is really like. If the place is dark even with all the blinds open and lights on and natural light is really important to you, it might not be the house for you.

It’s too perfect
A home that’s really well staged can look super appealing. But buyers have to train themselves to look at the home, not the furniture and furnishings. What will the house look like without that staged furniture? Does the floorplan work for you? Are the pieces scaled for the room or for real families? Are there any curious configurations like a chair blocking access to a fireplace. Getting past the stager’s tricks to see the house for what it is will help you to decide if it’s really for you.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

IMPORTANT THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT HOME INSPECTIONS

If you’re hiring someone to inspect the home you want to buy, or you’re a seller trying to find out if there are any hidden problems that need fixing before you put your home on the market, here are five things you need to know:

1. You can choose your home inspector.

Your real estate professional can recommend an inspector, or you can find one on your own. Members of the National Association of Home Inspectors, Inc. (NAHI), must complete an approved home inspector training program, demonstrate experience and competence as a home inspector, complete a written exam, and adhere to the NAHI Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics.

2. Home inspections are intended to point out adverse conditions, not cosmetic flaws.

You should attend the inspection and follow the inspector throughout the inspection so you can learn what’s important and what’s not. No house is perfect and an inspection on any home is bound to uncover faults. A home inspector will point out conditions that need repair and/or potential safety-related concerns relating to the home. They won’t comment on cosmetic items if they don’t impair the integrity of the home. They also do not do destructive testing.

3. Home inspection reports include only the basics.

A home inspector considers hundreds of items during an average inspection. The home inspection should include the home’s exterior, steps, porches, decks, chimneys, roof, windows, and doors. Inside, they will look at attics, electrical components, plumbing, central heating and air conditioning, basement/crawlspaces, and garages.

They report on the working order of items such as faucets to see if they leak, or garage doors to see if they close properly. Inspectors may point out termite damage and suggest that you get a separate pest inspection. The final written report should be concise and easy to understand.

4. Home inspectors work for the party who is paying the fee.

The NAHI Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics clearly state that members act as an unbiased third party to the real estate transaction and “will discharge the Inspector’s duties with integrity and fidelity to the client.” A reputable home inspector will not conduct a home inspection or prepare a home inspection report if his or her fee is contingent on untruthful conclusions.

The inspector should maintain client confidentiality and keep all report findings private, unless required by court order. That means it is your choice whether or not to share the report with others. If you’re a seller, you don’t have to disclose the report to buyers, but you must disclose any failure in the systems or integrity of your home.

5. Inspectors are not responsible for the condition of the home.

Inspectors don’t go behind walls or under flooring, so it’s possible that a serious problem can be overlooked. Keep in mind that inspectors are not party to the sales transaction, so if you buy a home where an expensive problem surfaces after the sale, you won’t be able to make the inspector liable or get the inspector to pay for the damage. In fact, you may not be entitled to any compensation beyond the cost of the inspection.

As a buyer, you need the home inspection to decide if the home is in condition that you can tolerate. You can use the report to show the seller the need for a certain repair or negotiate a better price. You can also take the report to a contractor and use it to make repairs or to remodel a section of the home.

One thing you should not do when buying a home is skip having the home inspected because of cost or undue pressure by the seller. A home inspection is reasonable, it can save you money in the long run, and it’s required by many lenders, particularly for FHA loans. There’s a reason why buyers should beware, and a home inspection gives you the information you need to make a sound buying decision.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

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