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Homebuyers Are Rethinking Densely Populated Areas!

The coronavirus pandemic and, especially the lockdown that has had people around the world sheltering in place, may have forever changed how we perceive “home” and what we are looking for when it comes to our little place in the world.

“The coronavirus pandemic has many Americans rethinking the kind of lifestyle they want,” said MANSION GLOBAL. “Apartment living in central, densely populated urban areas is losing its appeal as residents are subject to building restrictions and risk coming into contact with people infected by the virus.”

Real estate agents and companies across the country are reporting a heightened interest in buying homes in the suburbs. In many cases, buyers are even accelerating their purchases to get out of the city and into a suburban home now.

“The pandemic has altered how residential property is bought and sold, changes that aren’t likely to disappear any time soon and that could reshape the American dream long after the current crisis has passed,” said USA Today. “A growing number of Americans are considering fleeing cities for the suburbs, to put more distance between themselves and their neighbors.”

USA Today reports that searches for real estate in small towns is up exponentially over major metro areas. Also driving this trend: An increase in work-from-home flexibility. “Remote work will become more prevalent,’’ said Lawrence Yun, chief economist for the National Association of Realtors (NAR). “That means there is less need to be close to the job centers. Suburbs and exurbs (areas situated beyond the suburbs and in, or adjacent to, rural areas) will get a greater interest. In addition, a larger single-family home with extra elbow room will be desired, such as dedicated office space and a personal gym.”

A new Harris Poll backs up that assertion. It found that “almost a third of Americans are thinking about moving to less densely populated areas,” said USA Today. “And 43% of city dwellers had recently checked a real estate site for a house or apartment to rent or buy as compared to 26% of those in the suburbs, and 21% of those in rural areas.”

In places like New York City, known for its density and also for being one of the world’s coronavirus hotspots, “There’s a sudden rush on real estate in the suburbs,” Alison Farn-Leigh, a sales agent with Berkshire Hathaway, told CBS Local. “I would describe it as nothing short of a frenzy. I get a lot of, ‘In one to two years, we knew we were going to do this, but now, we have to do it now.’”

Despite waning activity in many places, suburban areas around New York are on fire, and it’s especially prevalent among high-end buyers. “New York’s wealthy are moving their money—and often their families—into surrounding suburbs and exurbs as they look to escape a crowded lifestyle and reduce their risk of contracting coronavirus,” said CNBC.

The numbers are astounding. According to FlatRate.com, “Compared to March 15 through May 10 of last year, requests for moves within New York City dropped 30%,” said CBS Local. “Meanwhile, moves from the city to Connecticut are up 80%, to Long Island up nearly 60%, to New Jersey up nearly 43%, and to Westchester up 33%.”

Real estate advisor Owen Berkowitz of the Berkowitz Marrone Team at Douglas Elliman told CNBC that he “can’t remember the last time we were this busy,” while “Eighteen people are waiting to see a home in Greenwich, Connecticut, that is renting for $65,000 a month,” another broker said.

If you’re considering a move to the suburbs, here are a few things to consider:

The commute— If you’re within close proximity to work now, you’re probably not excited about having to spend an hour or two—or more—in the car every day. Then again, more flexibility might mean living farther away won’t be an issue. If you will be commuting, it’s recommended that you do the drive a few times during rush hour so you can make sure you can endure it on a regular basis.

The yard— If you’re coming from an urban area, especially if you live in apartment or a condo, you might not have any outdoor space at all. And while you may be envisioning a great big yard, many single-family homes today—at least in a moderate price range—are rather short on outdoor space. Still, having a yard of any size will require upkeep. Don’t forget to factor in the cost of landscaping and ongoing maintenance when you’re creating your homebuying budget.

The amenities— The suburbs are loaded with newer construction and master planned communities, many of which have amenities like pools, trails, and clubhouses. Of course, purchasing in one of these communities typically means you’ll be paying Homeowner’s Association (HOA dues) as well as additional fees in some areas. Be sure you know about all the additional costs of specific neighborhoods when house hunting.

The stuff to do— It’s an exaggeration and a generalization to say there’s nothing to do in the suburbs. You might be surprised at how good the local restaurants are and how many entertainment and cultural options are nearby, not to mention abundant recreational opportunities. But if you live in the city and, especially, if you’re in an area where you can currently walk to your favorite café, the theater, and museums and galleries, you might be in for a rude awakening. While some suburban communities are veering toward greater walkability, many will require you to drive to your new favorite spots. While you’re considering suburban areas, you might also want to take a look at the nightlife, if that’s your thing. Eateries and bars might be more likely to close at a “decent hour” instead of staying open until early morning.

4 Things You Absolutely Must Get Rid Of Before You Move

So you’re moving, and on your verrrrrry long moving-related “to-do” list is that old favorite: packing. Did you just let out a big sigh at the thought? Us, too. Face it, it’s no fun. Actually putting stuff in boxes isn’t the hard part for many people; It’s the dreaded sorting and decluttering and getting rid of stuff that sends many into a panic. Take a deep breath and we’ll get through these tips together.

First, use this advice from Rent.com as an overall rule of thumb: “For one, if it’s damaged, it should be thrown away, no exceptions. Also, if it’s spent more than six months unused, you likely won’t miss it if you get rid of it. For clothes, if you haven’t worn a garment in over a year, it should be donated– that way you don’t get rid of seasonal clothes you may need in a few months.”

Now, let’s break down the specifics.

Paperwork

If you’ve got boxes and boxes of old receipts and taxes and printed emails dating back to the turn of the century, it’s time to dive in. “Keep everything for seven years” is ingrained in many of our brains, but, according to financial expert Suze Orman, that’s not necessary. She says the only thing that needs to be kept for seven years are records of satisfied loans. Income tax returns only need to be kept for three years (can we get a Hallelujah?). But, there are some reasons to keep them longer, depending on your withholdings. You can see all her recommendations here.

Mementos and heirlooms

It can get sticky when it comes to things you’ve been willed or handed down. If you feel like you need to hold on to that old antique dresser that’s been in your family for two generations – and that’s sitting in the garage because it’s not your style – or your grandmother’s china that you’ll never use, we get it. If you know you’ll never use the item as is (China? Not even for Thanksgiving?), can’t find a way to repurpose the item (Can that old sideboard be painted?), and there isn’t another family member who will take it, maybe it’s time to think about selling it. You might be surprised at how valuable old antiques and collectibles can be. And, if you’re feeling bad about selling your heirlooms, you can always donate the money to a worthy cause; that will help you assuage your guilt.

Clothes

Getting rid of clothes can be overwhelming. No one is saying you have to pare down to a week’s worth of outfits and shoes, but if you’re moving to a smaller space or just want to be more organized when you move, the closet is a great place to start.

Most experts recommend getting rid of anything you haven’t worn in a year, but if the thought of purging that many items is giving you anxiety, start by asking yourself a few questions, said The Spruce:

  • Do I love it?
  • Do I wear it?
  • Does it project the image I want to project?
  • Does it itch or scratch?
  • Does it pinch my toes? Are the heels too high to walk in?
  • Is it moldy? Smelly? Stained?
  • Does it fit?”

When you get to No. 7, take a deep breath. Many people have clothes in a couple of sizes to accommodate things like post-pizza-pigout days, but if you’re holding on to 15 pairs of pants that haven’t fit you since 2002, maybe it’s time to ditch them.

Broken, scratched or tired furniture

Old, boring, broken, or otherwise undesirable pieces you’ve been living with in your current home may not be so tolerable once you move. Your shiny new place deserves some shiny new stuff, right? If you’re not in a position to shell out a bunch of money after buying your new home, wait a bit. You’ll undoubtedly be receiving credit card offers after you close escrow; sift through them and set aside those offering 0% interest from furniture stores like Rooms to Go.

These can make big purchases easier – if you are good at managing your credit. Miss a payment or fail to pay off your balance within the allotted time and you’ll have interest accrued going back to the date of purchase plus a whopping interest rate, which can put payments out of reach. You may also receive 0% interest offers from places like Lowes and Home Depot, which can be a great way to update appliances, flooring, or countertops, and Best Buy for your electronic needs.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-525

Protectecting Yourself During a Move

“I can’t wait to move!”

How often do you hear someone say that? What they mean is they can’t wait to be in their new place, all unpacked and organized and enjoying their new surroundings.

What they don’t mean is, “I can’t wait to spend a month packing up everything I own and hauling it into a truck we’re going to drive across country when I’ve never driven anything larger than a mid-sized sedan, only to have to haul it all out, and into that new house. The new house that has two flights of stairs and narrow hallways. Don’t get me started on unpacking boxes.”

And what they REALLY don’t mean is, “I can’t wait for the movers to break a bunch of my things and lose a bunch of stuff.” Pretty sure they also don’t mean, “I can’t wait for dishonest movers to delay my delivery and charge me quadruple my quote and then hold all my stuff hostage while I sit here helpless.”

Think that could never happen to you?

“Last year, Massachusetts officials sued one moving company and New Jersey officials sued two for providing low-ball estimates and then grossly inflating fees after loading the trucks,” said Consumer Reports. “One of the companies had threatened to auction the possessions of customers who didn’t pay.”

Added MarketWatch about the possibility of mover fraud: “Typically, a mover gives you an extremely low estimate over the phone or Internet without ever actually seeing what needs to be moved. You agree, they show up, load the truck with all your worldly possessions and then tell you it will actually cost a lot more. Then, they hold everything you own hostage on their truck until you cough up the extra cash.”

Yes, moving can be fraught with challenge and frustration and even heartache. So how do you protect yourself? Here are some tips for a safe and fraud-free move.

Do your research

Proper preparation can help you ward off many of the issues that can turn a move into a nightmare, and that’s starts with a healthy dose of research. You always want to ask for a referral rather than using an unknown. And not just anyone is qualified to give a referral, according to MSN.

“Ask your real-estate agent. The general consensus among moving professionals is that word of mouth is the best way to find a good mover,” they said. “Real-estate agents know the ins and outs of the housing industry and are the most reliable sources. Realtors want to make sure that your (moving) transaction is a good one.”

There are also websites dedicated to moving scams. “MovingScam.com maintains a ‘black list,'” they said, as well as a “message board filled with consumer experiences, bad and good.”

Verify licensing and look for complaints

MSN recommends people who are moving investigate the companies they are looking at using. Interstate movers must be licensed by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.

“Check with your area’s Better Business Bureau to see if any complaints have been filed and whether there are reliable,” they said.

Protect Your Move also provides info on whether a mover’s license is current “and if the company has ever had a federal complaint.”

Watch out for the lowball bid

“You get what you paid for” is often a dangerous reality when it comes to moving. To protect yourself against unethical movers, get several estimates and make sure to weed out any that seem too low. Yes, the desire to save money is strong. But an unusually low bid is often a red flag.

“When shopping for movers, it’s best to get at least three estimates, ” said MSN. “If you’ve got one that’s really, really low compared to the other two, you’re going to know something’s up.”

Have a contingency plan

No matter how well you prepare, the unexpected can still happen. What if the truck doesn’t show up on time? Are you prepared to live without your things for a few days, or longer? Make sure you pack a bag of essentials you can have with you while the rest of your stuff is stuck on the truck.

Protect yourself

The Better Business Bureau suggests paying a little extra for peace of mind.

“Consider accepting full value protection. It may cost a few dollars more up front, but it can eliminate headaches after your move,” they said. “Purchasing full (replacement) value protection from your mover means any lost or damaged articles will be repaired or replaced, or a cash settlement will be made to repair the item or to replace it at its current market value, regardless of age. The cost of full value protection must be included in the initial estimate you receive for an interstate move.”

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

5 Ways to Find The Right Movers When Moving Into a New Home

They say that the sun never sleeps in Phoenix, which is why moving there can be an exciting experience. However, there are a lot of things to take care of when moving. You need to find the perfect neighborhood and think about the stuff like which extra features are worth the money. In the rush of moving, many fail to focus on a crucial detail – finding the right moving company.

Movers can become an essential part of your moving experience. They can make the entire process a breeze or turn it into a nightmare. Don’t forget that they will be handling all your possessions, which is why you need to find a company you can trust. Take a look at 5 ways to find the right movers when moving into a new home in Phoenix:

Make Sure Your Movers Are Full-Time Professionals
Moving companies often hire sub-contractors that work part-time and come and go as they please. They are not a good choice because they lack skills and motivation to do the job the right way. Instead, you need to ensure that full-time professionals will handle your moving into a new home.

When you find an experienced team of professional movers, you know that you and your possessions will be treated with the utmost respect and courtesy. A professional crew of movers is well-coordinated, and they all feel like a part of the company. That guarantees that they will handle the move swiftly and with care. You can make the experience of moving in Phoenix even easier if you apply these tips from Low Budget Movers.

The Moving Company Must Provide Insurance Information
Regardless of how careful the movers are, accidents can happen. That is why you should make sure that your belongings are protected in case anything goes wrong. Any reputable moving company will be ready to provide insurance information upon your request.

There are various types of insurance movers can offer. Replacement insurance guarantees that your items will be replaced if they are damaged. Reputable movers also provide extra coverage for antiques and other expensive items.

Get Written Estimates from Several Companies
It might seem that the first movers you came across are the right choice, but make sure you get written estimates from several companies. If you’re getting an estimate over the phone or online, you should be as detailed as possible when telling about your moving needs.

Always ask movers to precisely explain what you are getting for the quoted fee. Beware of hidden expenses that can be made up along the way, such as travel, fuel or stair fees. When you narrow your options to a couple of moving companies, it might be a good idea to call them to visit you and make the final estimate.

Do the Research
You should put on your detective hat and inspect the reputation of the moving company you want to hire. First of all, you should make sure that it is a well-known company, so stay clear of those suspicious movers from Craigslist. After all, you don’t want just anyone handling your valuable possessions.

Any reputable company will have an updated website with its list of services. You can start there and move on to their social media pages to read comments from previous clients. A high BBB (Better Business Bureau) rating is also a sign of a reputable moving company, as well as any other reviews you can find online. Don’t worry if you run into a bad review or two; the important thing is that the majority of them are positive.

Ask Questions:
You should ask all sorts of questions to find out more about the movers. These include:

  • How long has the company been in business?
  • Do they provide a guarantee that the delivery will be completed on the desired date?
  • Do they run background checks on their movers?
  • Do they have their own equipment or rent a moving van?
  • Can the movers disassemble and assemble furniture?

Reputable companies understand the importance of establishing a relationship with the client. That is why they will be prepared to answer any questions you might have with ease and provide clear and detailed answers.

In the end, it is important to realize that choosing the right movers is an essential part of moving in Phoenix – and anywhere else. It might take a bit time and effort, but it will prove to be a wise investment. By selecting the right moving company, you will prevent any possible problems that may occur during the process.

For a list of moving companies we recommend please give us a call at 480-213-5251 or visit lowbudgetmovers.net.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

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