position realty

Position Yourself For Success

The Worst Parts of Buying a House

It’s normal to romanticize buying a house. It’s one of the biggest things you do in life, and you may have dreamed of the time when you could become a homeowner. While there’s a lot to be said for the upsides of purchasing a home, that doesn’t mean it’s not a tough process.

Particularly in the current market, buying a house can be frustrating and demoralizing.

Sometimes, knowing to prepare yourself for letdowns and challenges can help you make a smarter decision overall.

According to homebuyers, the following are the worst parts of the process with that in mind.

Dealing with High Prices

Home prices are at historic highs right now. Certain markets are more affected than others, but almost across the board, this is true.

There are many reasons for the high prices, from inflation and supply chain issues to low inventory.

It’s tough because what someone could have afforded in the market that existed just a few years ago isn’t today’s reality.

Avoiding Overbuying

In line with the high prices buyers are facing universally right now, you have to make sure that you’re not overbuying. What happens to many people when they buy a home, particularly if it’s their first time, is that they let emotion take over.

You might have gone into the process with a clear budget, determined to stick with it.

Then, you get into the heated, competitive marketplace and fall in love with a home out of your budget.

You might develop an emotional attachment to that home, and you could spend either more than you can afford or more than it’s worth.

Keeping your emotions in check is one of the most difficult parts of buying a home for a lot of people.

You have to remind yourself repeatedly to stick with the facts rather than emotions.

Being in a Bidding War

Bidding wars are everywhere right now, as you might realize. Some people put in a full-ask, all-cash offer for a home and are promptly outbid. It’s such a competitive marketplace, and the emotional component can again come into play.

If you’re part of a bidding war, it’s easier to get caught up in what’s going on at the moment and pay more than you should. You might theoretically be the winner, but you could be the loser because you’re paying more than the house is worth.

There can be significant financial consequences of overpaying for a property, no matter what the market is like right now. Mortgage lenders only give loans based on the property’s actual value, not what you want to pay. Even if you bid the price up, that doesn’t mean that’s the loan you’re getting.

At the same time, if you keep getting outbid, it can also make you feel frustrated and like you’re never going to find a home. Plus, if you’re renting, you’re continuing to put money toward that.

The Paperwork

The paperwork that comes with getting a mortgage and buying a home is challenging.

Just how complex and burdensome the paperwork is can vary depending on the type of loan you’re trying to get and your financial situation.

If you’re self-employed, you’re probably going to find the loan process is the worst part of buying a house. You have to show years of bank statements and tax returns.

As you wait to finalize your loan, you might feel anxious about everything. Your loan might not even be finalized until a few days before closing, and there’s uncertainty as you feel like you’re in limbo.

While there are certainly downsides that come with buying a house, the reward will be worth the sacrifice if you take your time and make a good financial choice.

Position Realty
480-213-5251

Signs You’re Overpaying for a House

Unfortunately, overpaying for a house is a common issue among buyers right now. The market is incredibly hot across the country. The demand for homes is high, and the supply is low. Many people are trying to buy houses only to find themselves in bidding wars.

Bidding wars can make it more likely that you overpay for a house.

When you overpay for a house, you’re going to spend more on everything, including the down payment, the closing costs, and the thousands more you pay in interest over the years.

So how do you know you could potentially be overpaying? No matter what your emotions are telling you, the following are signs and red flags to watch out for in the process.

The Listing Price Is Different From Comps in the Area

If you find a home that you feel is what you’re dreaming of, but the listing price seems out of line with the sales of comparable properties in the area, it’s potentially a red flag.

It could be that the seller priced their home based on the values of neighboring homes instead of what they’re selling for.

Working with an experienced real estate agent who understands the current market can help you a lot here.

You have to look beyond the value of a home. You have to consider the community, the local school district, and many other factors. Again, your realtor should already understand these factors and be able to negotiate on your behalf with these in mind.

Homes in the same neighborhood should be similar in price. There will be variance based on things like size, but generally, the features will be similar enough that you can use comparables as a good guide.

Online Estimates Are Lower

Online valuation tools have their flaws, but they’ve gotten significantly more accurate over the past few years.

If you go online and valuation tools value a home lower than the list price, you could be in the danger zone for overpaying.

Of course, you have to keep everything in context, so maybe the kitchen is recently remodeled, in which case the home might have a bit of a higher value.

The Listing Price is Similar to Homes No Longer on the Market

This red flag can take a little more research to figure out but if you’re looking at a home with comps similar to sellers who have taken theirs off the market, keep this in mind.

An agent will have access to homes that were taken off the market. If the asking price on these unsold homes is similar to what you’re looking at, it could be overpriced.

It’s Been on the Market for a Long Time

If a home has been on the market a long time, you could be at risk of overpaying. A home that’s priced too high doesn’t get showings or interest and then doesn’t get offers. You need to think carefully about why other people might be passing on the home.

Of course, if you’re in the situation where you’re in a bidding war, it can be different. You might be at risk of overpaying simply because you’re caught up in the emotion and the competitive element. If you’re going well beyond your budget simply because you end up in a bidding war, it’s probably time to take a step back and reassess.

No matter the value of a home, if you pay more than what you can comfortably afford, then you’ve ultimately overpaid.

Position Realty
480-213-5251

How to Save for a Down Payment While You’re Renting

Rent prices continue to rise throughout the U.S., which creates a disheartening and discouraging scenario for many people.

As of February 1 2022, median rents for one- and two-bedroom units are up 26% since last year.

One-bedroom rentals are at an all-time median high right now.

High rental prices coincide with a housing market that’s overheated. Demand, inflation, and reductions in home construction have led to record-setting home prices. Potential homebuyers are being priced out, requiring them to stay in the rental market, putting pressure on rent prices.

For renters, it can seem like a difficult cycle to break—how can you save for a down payment when such a large chunk of your income is going toward rent? Homeownership feels unattainable for a large portion of the population.

It’s decidedly not an easy issue to work your way out of, but it is possible.

Figure Out What You Need

The first thing you can do is start to crunch the numbers. If you have a concrete number for the down payment you need, it will be easier to work toward your goals. If you don’t have a plan in mind or a set number to work toward, you’re going to feel scattered, and it will be much harder to get out of the rent cycle.

The down payment will depend on the type of loan you hope to get and where you plan to buy.

There are mortgages with a down payment as low as 3%, giving you opportunities to save up in a shorter period of time.

You may have to pay for private mortgage insurance if you don’t put down 20%, however.

You have to think about other costs that you’ll need upfront money for to buy a home. These costs include closing fees and the costs of moving.

Open a Dedicated Down Payment Savings Account

Once you have a concrete number in mind and have explored the mortgage options available to you, and know which you’d like to ultimately get, you can create a savings account. This account will only be for your down payment and nothing else.

It should be liquid but separate from anything else so that you aren’t tempted to spend the money in it.

Deal with Debt

You’re going to need to find ways to cut costs if you want to put more money aside to buy a house. Cutting your debt is going to be one way to do that.

If you have a balance on a credit card with a high interest rate, you might try to do a balance transfer. You can transfer the expensive debt to a card with a zero-percent interest period.

If buying a house is your goal, try not to add any more debt during this time.

To qualify to get a mortgage, you’ll have to meet the debt-to-income requirement.

Find Ways to Cut Back

It’s hard to give things up, but if you’re putting a fair amount of money into your rent, there’s not a lot you can do about that unless you’re willing to move.

You’ll have to find other ways you can cut your costs. That might mean skipping meals out or delivery food or going through your subscriptions to see what you can eliminate.

Think About Moving

We mentioned moving above, and you may not be willing or able to do it, but if you can, cutting down on what you’re paying for rent is one of the best ways to have more money to put toward a down payment.

If you can’t move to a smaller or less expensive home, you might try to renegotiate your lease with your landlord, or you could get a roommate. If you can move, along with getting a smaller place, another option is to move outside of the center city area, if you live there currently. Typically, the further out you move from the central area of your town or city, the lower the rent.

Explore Assistance Programs

Finally, many mortgage lenders have programs and loans for first-time homebuyers that cover part or all of a down payment. There are also grants, which require you to complete a homebuyer education course before you get the financial assistance.

If you work in certain fields, like as a first responder or teacher, homebuying assistance programs are often available.

A lot of lenders are looking to reach out to underserved communities to help them make homeownership a reality, so make sure to explore everything that’s out there.

Position Realty: 480-213-5251

Renting? You’re Still Paying a Mortgage…Just Not Your Own

For those who invest in real estate, cash flow is king. Investors considering buying a rental property take into account how much rent can be charged compared to ownership costs. Those costs can include a mortgage, property taxes, insurance and maintenance. If the expected rental is more than that, the property will cash flow. Otherwise, it’s an expense and the investor is likely to move on to another property. There are also some tax incentives for real estate investors.

For renters, they need to consider how much they can comfortably afford each month for housing and utilities. Lenders typically view about one-third of gross monthly income should be used as a general rule of affordability. As rent is paid each month, the investor takes that cash and pays the mortgage with it. In essence, you are paying a mortgage, just a mortgage that belongs to someone else.

For first time buyers, getting financing can be a bewildering process for some. There’s lots of documents that need to be signed and reviewed. Lenders need to make sure you have enough funds on hand for a down payment, closing costs and leftover cash reserves. Credit is reviewed as is employment and income. But it doesn’t need to be an intimidating process. That’s also where a good loan officer comes into play, to walk with you side-by-side from initial prequalification to the settlement table.

Most renters will ultimately end up owning at some point in the future. In the long run, owning compared to renting makes sense in a lot of ways. In today’s interest rate market where rates are low compared to areas where rents are steadily increasing, it’s ultimately cheaper to own compared to renting.

Renters may have a goal of owning but not sure how to get there and when. They realize renting is not a long term solution, but their current situation makes it better to rent than own. Someone that is short term for example is probably a better renting candidate compared to someone with the intent to keep the property for the long haul.

It’s usually at this stage where renters first begin to get the urge to explore buying. They can do their own research online to get an idea on where rates are and even run a few mortgage calculators to see what monthly payments might be. Yet it’s important at this point to stop flying solo and contact an experienced loan officer. If you don’t know of anyone in the mortgage business, your real estate agent can point you in the right direction as well as friends, family and co-workers.

Your loan officer will provide you with an approximate qualifying loan amount for starters. This prequalification takes into account your gross monthly income and expenses and at some point, your credit report will be pulled along with credit scores. Your loan officer will give you an estimated amount for a down payment and associated closing costs. It’s a lot easier to be an owner than you might think. Maybe if you’re asking these questions, it’s time to get your own mortgage and stop paying for someone else’s.

Position Realty
(480) 213-5251

What is the Hardest Part of Buying a House?

Everyone experiences things differently, and that includes buying a house. You may think one element or purchasing a home is hard, while someone else could find another more challenging.

With that being said, in general, the following are some of the things many people say are most difficult when they’re buying a home.

Home Price

Home prices have been soaring since the pandemic. Homeowners say even after they’re able to purchase a property, when they look back on the experience, the prices were the most challenging part of everything.

In certain markets currently, major bidding wars are going on, especially for starter homes but often for properties across all budget ranges. There’s a limited inventory of homes, people are afraid to sell because they don’t know if they’ll find something else, and mortgage rates remain at record lows. All of these factors can make it feel impossible to buy a home.

The Paperwork

When you decide to buy a home, you may find the paperwork most challenging, although how hard this is depends on the type of loan you’re applying for and your job and financial situation.

For example, if you’re self-employed, the paperwork and loan process itself can be more difficult. You’ll have to show several years of tax returns and bank statements, just to start.

As you’re waiting to finalize the loan, you may find that it creates a lot of anxiety. Your loan often isn’t finalized until just a few days before you close. You have to wait in limbo until the last moment, and you may not have a clear idea of what’s happening with it during this time of uncertainty.

The Emotions

You may not realize it until you actually start the process but buying a home can be highly emotional in different ways. You might find yourself falling in love with a house that’s way out of your budget for example, and overspending. When you work with a great realtor, they can help you stay objective so you don’t put yourself in a precarious financial situation because of your emotions.

It’s easy to start to feel overwhelmed and discouraged when you lose out on a house as well.

You overall have to learn how to manage your expectations when you go into the home-buying process. You have to prioritize the most important things and be ready to walk away if something like a bad inspection happens.

Saving for a Down Payment

The down payment is related to the cost of the home you plan to buy, and it’s one of the biggest hurdles to buying a home. It can be incredibly challenging to save for a substantial down payment when you’re already paying rent.

Agreeing

If you’re buying a home with your partner, agreeing might end up being the hardest part for you.

You may have an ideal home in your mind that’s completely different from what they have in mind. You could fall in love with something that your partner says absolutely no to. It can be challenging, but you can void some of these pitfalls by having in-depth discussions about what you both want early on.

Many of the other hardest things about buying a home can be navigated by an experienced real estate agent—that’s what they’re there for—to make things easier on you and bring their expertise to an otherwise stressful situation.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

Avoid FIVE Real Estate Regrets

Can you tell good real estate advice from bad?

Unfortunately, for buyers and sellers the answer is usually, “Yes, in hindsight!” That is, after they have bought or sold.

After buyers move in or sellers move out, many things become clear. Buyers and sellers begin to discover whether the advice they followed—from family, friends, social media, how-to’s…—was the best advice to act on.

I have always believed that a type of stress-driven “temporary insanity” can descend on buyers and sellers. This is especially true if they put extra pressure on themselves by searching for a “dream or forever home.”

Clear thinking, capable individuals become frazzled. They are caught in a high-pressure vortex of unfamiliar real estate decisions, most of which must be made quickly and often without knowing or understanding all the implications:

• This is particularly true for sellers who are attempting to decide whether to let go of the home they love and at what price, often without knowing exactly what will be next for them.

• Buyers, especially first-timers, are frantically trying to project their lives into someone else’s home, under time pressures and without really understanding all that’s involved.

The most common hindsight regret and disappointment for buyers is “the one that got away”—the real estate they could have bought but didn’t.

These unmade decisions haunt some people for decades. Avoid hindsight regrets with foresight:

The 5 Most Common Hindsight Regrets

Regret #1. That we didn’t buy the house beside or behind ours, or both.
We’d have had an undisturbed view, privacy, and an amazing pool-sized backyard. The resulting large real estate holding could have set us up financially. Instead, we have a huge new house towering over ours—this is often the result when new neighbors renovate. “If only we’d…” regrets are no solution to not acting when opportunities arise.

Regret #2. That we began the search for a seasonal home, then got distracted, and nothing happened.
We keep kicking ourselves for not following through and buying that wonderful get-a-way. Now, vacation properties have climbed in value and may be out of reach. Hesitation undermines many buyers.

Regret #3. That we compromised on permanent, physical real estate characteristics to buy a property for its trendy, cosmetic features.
Letting go of a dream, like buying a detached home or a preferred location, cannot be reversed. Choosing a property because of “must have” fashionable decor features like open concept or a dream kitchen can represent short-term thinking. These features will wear out and go out of style; location and neighborhood values usually keep appreciating.

Regret #4. That we got swept away in a bidding contest and paid more than we intended.
That extra money could have bought us a different property which would have put us in a better home or a better neighborhood. Now that regret has materialized as a larger mortgage.

Regret #5. That we waited for prices to drop back to “normal” when, in our ever-changing world, that “normal” is now “history.”
When sellers become buyers, they may end up with similar regrets. If they don’t apply forethought based on evaluating the success of their last purchase, they may find additional “history repeats itself” regrets in their next purchase.

Sellers can have “selling” regrets
Some sellers may get swept up in a hot market, without much thought about where they’ll live next. This same hot market can turn on them, so they don’t have as much purchasing power as they expected. They may regret they sold if they have to settle for less in their next home. Buying before you sell can make sense when listings are scarce and you have specific demands.

Not taking the time to calculate what you’ll net out of the sale, after all expenses, including real estate commission and legal fees, can be a big regret. This is especially true if the seller zeros in on price and picks the highest sale price out of the multiple offers. Fixation on sale price can lead to regrets about expenses related to transition housing or storage necessary to meet the closing date, replacing what was included in the sale, and/or the “close-ability” of the buyer if the deal falls through.

Regrets at turning down an OK offer—perhaps the only one received—because the seller and the buyer were a few thousand apart. Sellers may regret that they did not encourage their or the other real estate professional to find a way to “make it happen.” A seller may regret they had not been asked to hold a no- or low-interest second mortgage (a VTB or vendor-take-back mortgage) for the buyer. This would have closed the financial gap so the home sold at the seller’s price. This mortgage may be sold later to give the seller cash in hand.

Regrets are a waste of time and money!
Your real estate professional’s job is not to tell you what to buy nor to tell you when to sell.

Their function is to provide accurate real estate information, dispel misinformation, access available real estate listings and data, and follow your instructions.

Professionals are there to explain the real estate transaction, expedite the buying or selling process, and help you achieve your desired results or get as close to them as the market and location allow.

They can help you clarify your thinking, consider new alternatives, and confirm your priorities.

It’s up to you to take full advantage of this support to avoid regrets and achieve a real estate outcome you can live with.

Saving for a Down Payment When You Live Paycheck-to-Paycheck

A down payment is an important component of taking a step toward homeownership. Saving for a down payment is also the biggest obstacle that you probably face when you want to buy a home.

A down payment is the cash you pay upfront when you’re going to make a large purchase. If you were going to buy a $350,000 home with a 10% down payment, you’d need to have $35,000 in cash.

Then, your mortgage lender provides the rest of the money to buy the home, and you pay your lender back over time. There are a few exceptions to lenders requiring a down payment, such as VA loans, but generally, it is required.

It’s recommended that you put at least 20% down if you’re going to buy a house, but that can be a lot of money.

How do you save if you’re living paycheck-to-paycheck? It is possible, but you also might have to make some changes.

Take the First Step
Even though you might feel overwhelmed about the prospect of saving money when you’re barely making ends meet, just take one first step toward your goal. That step may be small or almost symbolic, but it’s the best way to get started.

One good first step is to open a savings account where you’ll deposit money that’s specifically meant to go toward your down payment.

You might want a savings account that pays a bit of interest as well.

Create a Budget
You may be in a cycle of living paycheck-to-paycheck that you don’t necessarily have to be in.

If you can drill down into what’s going out versus what’s coming in, you might find that there are some ways you can save money even on your current income.

Really taking an honest look at your income versus your spending can be challenging and overwhelming because you may not realize how much you’re spending on things that you don’t need to be. Doing it is rewarding and valuable, though.

When you create a budget, include in it money that you’re going to set aside every week or month that will go toward your down payment.

Even small contributions do add up over time if you’re consistent and patient.

If you’re not sure where to start with your budget, a lot of financial professionals recommend following what’s called the 50/30/20 rule. This means that 50% of your income goes toward your essentials, such as your rent. Thirty percent goes toward lifestyle-related expenses, like eating at restaurants. The other 20% should either go toward savings or paying off debt.

Cut Out Subscriptions
One of the best things you can do for your finances is to regularly evaluate what subscription fees you’re paying and cut them out. It sounds simple, but the reality is if you’re like the average American, you might be spending $237 a month on subscriptions. That’s a lot of money that could go elsewhere.

Go Over Every Bill Carefully
When you’re working with a relatively small amount of income compared to your expenses, you should go over every single bill and transaction carefully.

There are a few reasons for this.

First, you want to make sure there aren’t mistakes you’re paying for. You might also find ways to pay less. For example, you could ask for a lower rate on your credit cards if you have a history of on-time payments, or you might be able to talk to your car insurance company about good driver discounts.

There are a lot of opportunities to save money on your bills, if you know where to look at you’re willing to ask.

Add Income
Finally, once your budget is in order, it’s a good idea to add extra income to your life. There are so many ways to do this. When you’re not working your full-time job, maybe you deliver groceries or work for a rideshare service.

It doesn’t matter what it is, but when you add another stream of income, it puts you that much closer to your down payment.

Everything you earn from your secondary income source should go directly into your down payment savings account, so you aren’t tempted to use it on anything else.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

You Don’t Need 20% Down and Seven Other Myths That Are Getting in the Way of Homeownership

Think you need to come up with 20% for a down payment in order to buy a house? It might surprise you to know that the median down payment for first-time buyers last year was just 7%, per the National Association of Realtors®. And there are plenty of loan programs out there that require far less. The 20% myth is just one of the things that’s keeping homeownership out of reach. We’re digging in to seven others.

You need to be well-established in your forever career
There has been a lot of discussion about how millennials are waiting longer and longer to purchase homes. “As a result of their consequent struggle to save, millennials are delaying major life milestones like getting married and buying a home,” said Business Insider.

Nonetheless, there are still millennials jumping into the market because, even know their name isn’t yet on the door, they’re excited to have a home in their name. Having a stable job, a comfortable salary, and the desire to own a home may just be enough.

Sure, you might not be ready to buy the house of your dreams or move to the neighborhood where you can imagine raising kids and, someday, retiring, but that doesn’t mean you’re completely out of the game. A smaller place closer to work or an attached property can, quite literally, get your foot in the homeownership door and allow you to start earning equity.

You have to be completely out of debt
Recent data shows that nearly half of all undergraduates are delaying homeownership because of student loans. “According to a recent Federal Reserve study, a $1,000 increase in student loan debt lowers the homeownership rate by about 1.5%, equivalent to an average delay of about 2.5 months in attaining homeownership,” said Clever Real Estate. “For the average college debt holder with $37,000 in debt, that ends up being about a 7.7-year delay in their path homeownership.”

Regardless of your debt, whether it’s from student loans or credit cards, it may still be possible to qualify for a mortgage and afford the payments, especially because rents are often comparable to mortgage payments. Mortgage underwriters don’t expect homebuyers to be debt-free; In fact, having no debt might actually work against you. They like to see responsible credit use and management.

You need to have a family
Yes, many would-be homebuyers hold off until parenthood is looming, because they’re not ready to move to the suburbs, get married, and have kids. But, a third of today’s new homeowners are unmarried, according to CITYLAB. “The shift is detailed in a new working paper from Harvard University’s Joint Center for Housing Studies, in which researchers crunched demographic data from HUD and from American Housing Surveys taken every other year between 1997 and 2017. Perhaps the most notable departure from 20 years ago is the marital status of new homeowners. According to the paper, the share of married buyers declined from 61 percent in 1997 to just over half by 2017. Meanwhile, 35 percent of first-time homebuyers in 2017 had never been married.”

You need a 30-year conventional loan
There are tons of different loans that can help you purchase your first home, make payments more affordable and/or give you the flexibility you need to make homebuying affordable. FHA loans are among the most well-known and most popular loans for first-time buyers because they require just 3.5% down and have low credit score requirements. Other loans worth looking into depending on your circumstances include: government VA loans for veterans; USDA loans for properties in rural areas; and loans like Fannie Mae’s HomeStyle Renovation loan, which gives buyers bundled funds to purchase and make improvements to their home.

You need to have great credit
If your score isn’t in the 800s, or even the 700s, it doesn’t mean you’re going to be living that apartment life forever. You might be surprised to see the credit score minimums for some loans. “While there is no official minimum credit score for a home loan approval, the minimum FICO credit score for conventional loan approval tends to be around 620,” said Credit.com.

It has to be your primary home
“Some rich urban millennials are choosing to rent in the city and buy a vacation home instead of a primary residence,” said Business Insider. Meanwhile, some other savvy investors are continuing to rent and plunking down money to purchase homes in tourist-friendly locations so they can take advantage of the AirBNB craze. “According to Priceonomics, hosts on Airbnb are earning more than anyone else in the gig economy and are raking in an average of $924 a month,” said Travel & Leisure. “Airbnb hosts make nearly three times as much as other workers…with some hosts making more than $10,000 per month.”

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

9 Ways Becoming A Homeowner Can Change Your Life

Homeownership. It shifts so many things. If you’re coming from an apartment, you may experience conveniences like direct-access garages and walls that aren’t shared for the first time. If you’ve been renting a home, you will probably feel a new sense of security and peace of mind once the mortgage is in our name. Not to mention the itch to repaint, re-imagine, and redo at least a few dozen things.

Want to know just how becoming a homeowner can change your life? Read on.

1. Financial Security
“The largest measurable financial benefit to homeownership is price appreciation,” said Investopedia. “Price appreciation helps build home equity.” Added Real Estate ABC: “The principle you pay on the mortgage is like putting money in the bank, in the form of equity.”

2. Peace of mind
If you worry every time your lease comes up for renewal, those days are gladly over. Unless you refinance or take cash out once you have enough equity, your house payment is your house payment.

3. Pride of ownership
The feeling you get when you come home to your place – the place you scrimped and saved for and the place that represents a lifelong dream – well, there’s just no substitute.

4. Stake in your neighborhood
Pride of ownership extends to the homes and area around your house as well. Whether or not you move to a neighborhood with a homeowner’s association, buying a house will undoubtedly make you more invested in what’s going on around you. And that can mean increased property values if neighbors band together for common improvements.

5. Increased interest in HGTV. And DIY channel. And weekends at Home Depot.
Don’t be surprised if you start quoting Drew and Jonathan Scott or using terms like “mitered corners” and “refaced cabinets.” Which is good news, because the changes you make to your home won’t just mean greater enjoyment while you live there, but also potentially greater profit when you go to sell.

“Home ownership means you have free rein in the aesthetics of the home. When renting, you do not have the advantage of changing your environment to please you,” said Real Estate ABC. “You may be able to paint a room, but need to repaint back to the original color scheme when you move. Owning your own home means you can do whatever you please to make your environment both personalized and, in the process, add value to the home.”

6. Your honey do list may increase
But so will your satisfaction.

7. Tax breaks
“The second largest financial benefit of owning a home is tax savings,” said Investopedia. “The biggest of these is the ability to deduct the annual interest paid on a mortgage from income. Private mortgage insurance may also be a write off, on addition to fees paid at closing. If you have paid points, either discount or origination, you can deduct these as well.”

8. Expert knowledge of interest rates, neighborhood home prices, and area sales trends
When you’re in the process of buying and after you close escrow, you’re more likely to be tuned into what’s going on in the market and in your neighborhood. This can help you to make smart decisions about updates, upgrades, and refinancing, and can also make you a trusted resource among your friends who want to buy.

9. More financial responsibility in other parts of your life
With a home to take care of, you may be more clued in to other long-term investments and less wiling to spend frivolously.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

How Buyers Can Navigate a Seller’s Market

Most analysts would say that currently, we are in a seller’s market. The summer of 2020 has been an interesting time. While the coronavirus has negatively impacted much of the economy, real estate has been surging.

Much of this is likely due to the low interest rates, hovering below 3%. There are other factors too, including pent up demand following strict lockdowns during the spring, and for some people, there’s a focus on moving to the suburbs and away from bigger cities.

If you want to buy, there are a lot of factors in your favor right now, but also challenges because it is what you would characterize as a seller’s market.

In June, the median home price nationwide rose to $295,300, which was in part not only because of the factors named above but also because of low inventory.

Also, while we’ve talked a lot about unemployment over the past few months, we have to consider that many people didn’t lose their jobs. In households where people stayed employed, they may feel like they’re financially secure enough to buy a home.

Sellers are finding that they’re getting multiple offers and offers well above ask.

So what can buyers do during this time?

Be Decisive
If you’re going to jump into a seller’s market headfirst, you’re going to have to be decisive. Time is critical in these situations, and sometimes getting the home of your dreams is as simple as being first.

If you want to see a home that goes on the market, don’t wait until the weekend for a showing. Try to get a showing as soon as you can, or if that’s not possible, do a virtual showing.

Along with being decisive and ready for what’s coming, choose a great real estate agent. You don’t want a real estate agent who you’re playing phone tag with during a seller’s market, because you’re losing precious time. You want someone sharp and responsive.

Submit a Clean Offer
During a seller’s market, it’s not a good idea to give an offer with contingencies. This might actually mean the difference between offers for a seller. A seller might be more interested in finishing things up quickly rather than getting a higher price for their home.

If you can give up some of the traditional contingencies, then a seller might think your offer is more appealing because these provide you with chances to back out.

You can still protect yourself, even without contingencies. For example, maybe you get your loan completely underwritten. This means you go through the full loan process before you make an offer.

Let Go of Perfection
The inventory is really limited right now, and demand is high. This makes it even less likely that you’re going to find the perfect home, and that’s okay.

It’s sometimes better to buy a good home and then make it perfect rather than waiting for perfection to hit the market. There’s a very strong chance that even when inventory expands, there still won’t be a perfect home.

Be Disciplined with Your Budget
When bidding wars are possible, and things are competitive among buyers, it’s easy to get carried away. You may get so emotionally attached to a house that you’re willing to go well beyond your budget. Emotions are also heightened when you’re buying a home anyway.

Set a budget, and don’t let yourself go above it, no matter what the other offers may look like.

Sure, offering too much may get you the house, but it’s going to create financial stress for you for years to come.

Offer More Earnest Money
Earnest money is something like a deposit and you provide it alongside your bid. It’s a way to show the seller you’re serious, but if the deal doesn’t go through you can get that money back.

Usually, you’ll see buyers offering around 1%, but during a hot market, think about offering more. It shows that you’re more invested in the deal and less likely to let it slip through your fingers.

If you have the option to pay with cash, that’s almost always going to win you favor. Cash offers take out the element of financing contingencies, and they make for a simpler transaction, which is beneficial for buyers. A cash buyer also tends to be more serious, and when you buy with cash you’re not beholden to the lender through the closing process.

Finally, if you do enter the market and find that it’s not working for you, or maybe you’re nervous about the prospects, consider waiting. It’s easy to get carried away even in a buyer’s market. A seller’s market can be even more likely to lead you to make a poor financial decision.

Of course, it’s tough to time the market, but if you do have some flexibility in when you buy, consider holding off.

Position Realty
Office: 480-213-5251

Contact Form Powered By : XYZScripts.com
Info